Posts Tagged With: Abraham

Called to Share God’s Blessings

“For I have chosen him, so that he may command his children and his household after him to keep the way of the LORD by doing righteousness and justice, so that the LORD may bring upon Abraham what He has spoken about him” (Genesis 18:19; all Scripture quotations are from the New American Standard Bible).

Depiction of Abraham with the four heavenly visitors from a 14th-century French manuscript. Public domain, via Picryl.

Most Christians are familiar with the story about Abraham interceding for the people of Sodom. Three men [who turned out to be messengers of the Lord, one of whom spoke with divine authority (perhaps Jesus Himself)] informed Abraham that God would destroy the city of Sodom, where his nephew Lot lived. Abraham ended up bargaining with God, persuading Him to spare the city if He could find ten righteous people there (Genesis 18:16-33). God would not find ten righteous people, but He did spare Lot by taking him and his family out of the city before its destruction. (Judging by how Lot’s family conducted themselves after escaping Sodom, Abraham would have had to negotiate God down to finding only one righteous person.)

That is all merely for introduction. I want to focus on a few other aspects of this story. The Bible tells us that God chose to enter into a covenant with Abraham. He called Abraham to become the father of many nations, including “the chosen people,” Israel. Why was Abraham chosen? Why were his descendants chosen?

“Now the LORD said to Abram,
‘Go forth from your country,
And from your relatives
And from your father’s house,
To the land which I will show you;
And I will make you a great nation,
And I will bless you,
And make your name great;
And so you shall be a blessing;
And I will bless those who bless you,
And the one who curses you I will curse.
And in you all the families of the earth will be blessed’” (Genesis 12:1-3).

God chose Abraham and his descendants to be His witnesses in the world and eventually to bring forth the Messiah, Jesus, to become our Savior. (See Galatians 3:1-7 for more on this.) God did not want Abraham to keep all of the blessings to himself, nor did He want Abraham’s descendants to horde God’s blessings. God blessed His chosen people so that they could bless others.

God’s covenant, calling, and blessing to Abraham were generational. He did not keep them to himself; he passed them on to his son, Isaac, who then passed them on to Jacob, and so on. Their mission was to be witnesses for the one true God to the entire world.

This mission would reach this climax when Jesus came. His disciples were not supposed to keep His message to themselves. They, too, were called to bless the entire world with the testimony that the one true God had offered salvation through Jesus Christ:

“And Jesus came up and spoke to them, saying, ‘All authority has been given to Me in heaven and on earth. Go therefore and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all that I commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age’” (Matthew 28:18-20).

Like Abraham, we have a mission. We have received a covenant blessing to be children of God through faith in Jesus Christ. We do not keep this blessing to ourselves. We must share the good news with all who will receive it.

God called Abraham to “keep the way of the Lord by doing righteousness and justice.” We, too, must make righteousness and justice our aims. Let us devote our lives to pursuing righteousness and justice for our communities, culture, country, and the entire world. He did not call us to cling to our rights, privileges, and comforts, but to keep His way and do His will.

In Genesis 18, God revealed His will to Abraham. Note that Abraham did not pray only for his nephew. He probably thought, “I know there are some bad people in that city, but I cannot believe they are all bad. There have to be some good people in Sodom. I don’t want Lot to get hurt, but what about them?” Abraham was willing to pray that God would even spare sinners so that the righteous would not suffer.

How do we pray? Do we pray merely for our own comfort and blessings? Do we pray only for our families, friends, and other people we like? Are we willing to pray for the people who are hard to love? Are we bold to pray that God would show His righteousness, justice, and mercy to all people, even those whom we think are undeserving?

Are we eager to teach our children and grandchildren to live and pray like this: To share God’s blessings with everyone they can reach?

We cannot afford to hold onto God’s blessings. We must share them with others. Most importantly, we must train future generations to share God’s blessings and Gospel with others. God’s call upon your life is bigger than you may think. It is not limited to you. It extends to all nations and until He returns.

I would like to hear from you. Share your thoughts or suggestions by clicking the “Leave a comment” link below.

Copyright © 2021 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Family, God's Moral Attributes | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

God’s Righteousness and Justice. IV: Righteous Men—Noah

“But Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord. These are the records of the generations of Noah. Noah was a righteous man, blameless in his time; Noah walked with God” (Genesis 6:8–9; all Scripture quotations are from the New American Standard Bible).

“Noah’s Ark Mosaic Iconography.” Image by Dimitris Vetsikas from Pixabay.

One can grow discouraged contemplating God’s righteousness and justice if we have a wrong perspective. We see words like “righteous” and “blameless” and conclude we cannot measure up to those standards. After all, most of us cannot claim that our official slogan is “I’ve made it,” “I’ve got it all together,” or “I never make any mistakes.” For most of us, our slogan is probably the title of a Britney Spears song: “Oops, I Did It Again.”

I thank God that His Word does not hide the failures of His people. We read that Noah was “righteous” and “blameless.” We hear about how Abraham is the father of our faith. Moses is depicted as one of the greatest men of all time. Scripture honors the great heroes of the faith, but it also broadcasts their sins and shortcomings as loudly as their accomplishments.

The Bible introduces Noah shortly after summarizing the spiritual condition of mankind:

“Then the Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great on the earth, and that every intent of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” (Genesis 6:5).

The world was filled with violence (Gen. 6:11), wickedness, selfishness, and greed. It was so bad that Jesus compared the apostasy of the end times with the days of Noah:

“For the coming of the Son of Man will be just like the days of Noah. For as in those days before the flood they were eating and drinking, marrying and giving in marriage, until the day that Noah entered the ark, and they did not understand until the flood came and took them all away; so will the coming of the Son of Man be” (Matthew 24:37–39).

In a world that ignored God, where everybody sought pleasure, Noah “walked with God.” Therefore, he found favor (a few translations, including the King James Version, say he found “grace”) with God, Who called him to build an ark and preserve a remnant of living things while God judged the world’s sin.

Depiction of Genesis 9:20-27 in York Minster East Window. Photo by Jules and Jenny from Lincoln, UK,under a Creative Commons license via Wikimedia Commons.

However, Noah was not perfect. Genesis 9:20–27 tells us that he planted a vineyard after the flood and got drunk on some wine he made afterward. While drunk, he lay naked in his tent and was seen by his son Ham. In response, Ham’s brothers, Shem and Japheth, slipped in with their backs turned so they could cover their father without seeing him. It is not completely clear what the great shame and secret are here. It was not the wine: Shem and Japheth covered their father’s nakedness; they did not snatch his stash of home-brewed booze. Perhaps the Bible is politely not describing something that would have been obvious to ancient readers. Maybe Noah was doing something inappropriate in his drunken stupor. Maybe Ham did something with his father. Sometimes the Bible leaves out some details so that we can focus on our situation rather than critique the choices of the patriarchs. Noah was drunk, and whatever he did at that time would have humiliated the family if they still had any neighbors.

Whatever it was, Noah’s righteousness was not perfection. Great men of God often made big mistakes. Abraham “believed in the Lord; and He reckoned it to him as righteousness” (Genesis 15:6). However, Abraham would go on to lie about his wife, saying she was his sister, risking to have her taken in marriage by another man. Moses committed murder and later made excuses why he could not lead the Israelites. King David, a man after God’s own heart (1 Samuel 13:14) and ancestor of Jesus, committed adultery, conspiracy to murder, and other sins and crimes. None were perfect, but all would come to repentance as they grew in faith toward God.

A righteous person is not perfect. It is someone who comes to faith in God through Jesus Christ and desires to walk with Him. We might stumble. We might struggle. We might lose our focus at times. But, we can always return to Him in faith and receive forgiveness and renewal. No matter how you have sinned, simply confess your mistakes to God, repent, receive His forgiveness, and continue to walk with Him. Do not give up.

“Behold, as for the proud one, His soul is not right within him; But the righteous will live by his faith” (Habakkuk 2:4).

May we all grow in faith, love, hope, and knowledge of Christ Jesus.

How do you think God wants to reveal more of His righteousness through you? Share your thoughts by clicking the “Leave a comment” link below.

Copyright © 2020 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, God's Moral Attributes, God's Nature and Personality | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Scripture Sabbath Challenge—Genesis 17:1–6

Now when Abram was ninety-nine years old, the Lord appeared to Abram and said to him, “I am God Almighty; Walk before Me, and be blameless. I will establish My covenant between Me and you, And I will multiply you exceedingly.” Abram fell on his face, and God talked with him, saying, “As for Me, behold, My covenant is with you, And you will be the father of a multitude of nations. No longer shall your name be called Abram, But your name shall be Abraham; For I have made you the father of a multitude of nations. I will make you exceedingly fruitful, and I will make nations of you, and kings will come forth from you.” [Genesis 17:1–6. Scripture taken from the NEW AMERICAN STANDARD BIBLE®, Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission.]

This week, the Book of Common Prayer’s Daily Office readings have guided readers through the story of Abraham. Abraham’s life was a turning point in God’s dealings with humanity. Beginning with Abraham, God chose a people to whom He would reveal Himself. Through that group of people (the children of Israel), God would bless the world (Genesis 12:1–3). That blessing would culminate in the coming of the Saviour of the world, Jesus Christ our Lord. Through that covenant, God took a “nobody” and transformed him into a “somebody” whose life and faith still impact our world.

Genesis 17 is the third time God called Abraham (originally named Abram) into covenant relationship with Him. Each calling was not so much a new covenant; it was, instead, a reminder or a clarification of the covenant. In Genesis 12, God promised to make Abram into a great nation. In Genesis 15, God promised that this great nation would be his own descendants. However, since Abram’s wife Sarai (or Sarah) was already past child-bearing, they assumed that he needed to take matters into their own hands; instead of believing that God could do the impossible, Sarai suggested that Abram marry a second wife to bear children.

In Genesis 17, God reaffirmed the covenant. Abram was basically a nobody: a Middle-Eastern nomad wandering through the world he knew. Countless nomads wandered the lands of the Middle East throughout the centuries, herding sheep and surviving as he did, only to be forgotten by history. In many ways, he was not the kind of person we may view as a “hero”: at times dishonest, sometimes doubting God. In spite of all that, God chose to establish His covenant with Abram.

Three key thoughts are worth considering regarding this covenant. First, God initiated the covenant. Abram was not a great philosopher or wise man who could ponder his way to an awareness of the divine nature. Left to himself, Abram probably would have wandered around the ancient world, herding sheep, fighting feuds over watering holes, and worshipping his father’s idols. Abram would not have found God; instead, God found him. Let us always remember that we do not find Jesus; the Holy Spirit reveals Jesus to us. He finds us.

Second, God defined the covenant. God determined how He would bless Abram. The blessings of the covenant were decided by God. Abram did not bring God a list of terms, proposals, or counter-offers. God offered the blessing, the terms of the covenant, and the sign of the covenant. God called Abram to accept circumcision as a sign of the covenant; I’m sure Abram could have thought of some less-painful options, but he obeyed without offering a compromise suggestion.

We, too, should accept the call to follow God on His terms. Faith in God is not like dinner at an all-you-can-eat buffet (take what you like and leave the rest). God calls us to accept a relationship with Him on His terms, grounded in faith in His Son, Jesus Christ. Jesus Christ is our Lord—not our motivational therapist, buddy, or just someone we can call when we think we need a little help.

Finally, God chooses the recipient. We do not earn salvation. He calls us. Salvation begins with conviction by the Holy Spirit. If you think you need to get your life in order before coming to Jesus, you are wrong. He is calling you (even if it is through something as simple as this blog post), come to Him. He will start a work in your life and bring it to completion (Philippians 1:6).

God found Abram, an anonymous nomad whom history should have forgotten, and called him into a covenant relationship with Him. He transformed that nobody into Abraham, the father of many nations, patriarch of the world’s three major monotheistic religions, and ancestor of our Saviour. If we recognize God’s invitation and choose to obey, He will guide us to a destiny far beyond our expectations.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , | Leave a comment

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