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Light of the World: Exposing the Deeds of Darkness

Let no one deceive you with empty words, for because of these things the wrath of God comes upon the sons of disobedience. Therefore do not become partners with them; for at one time you were darkness, but now you are light in the Lord. Walk as children of light (for the fruit of light is found in all that is good and right and true), and try to discern what is pleasing to the Lord. Take no part in the unfruitful works of darkness, but instead expose them. For it is shameful even to speak of the things that they do in secret. But when anything is exposed by the light, it becomes visible, for anything that becomes visible is light. Therefore it says,
“Awake, O sleeper,
and arise from the dead,
and Christ will shine on you” (Ephesians 5:6–14, ESV).

A recent post shared how we are called to be the light of the world, by reflecting the true Light, Jesus Christ. Jesus calls us to reflect His light, saying, “You are the light of the world. A city set on a hill cannot be hidden. Nor do people light a lamp and put it under a basket, but on a stand, and it gives light to all in the house. In the same way, let your light shine before others, so that they may see your good works and give glory to your Father who is in heaven” (Matthew 5:14–16).

How do we reflect that light? Is it enough to wear t-shirts with religious sayings, post Bible verses on Facebook, talk about Jesus and church wherever you go, and slap a Christian bumper sticker on your car? Several years ago, my friend confessed that although he had several Christian bumper stickers on his car, his driving was definitely not glorifying God. Therefore, he did what he thought was reasonable: he removed the stickers. That misses the point, though. All of these forms of “Christian advertising” are great ways to begin a conversation about the Gospel and what Jesus has done in one’s life. However, when there is a conflict between our bumper stickers or Facebook statuses and our lifestyles, the answer is not to hide the light. The answer is to tap more deeply into the light of Christ.

Paul begins Ephesians 5 by writing, “Therefore be imitators of God, as beloved children. And walk in love, as Christ loved us and gave himself up for us, a fragrant offering and sacrifice to God” (Ephesians 5:1–2). Thus begins a chapter where he frequently refers to light: that word appears five times in Ephesians 5:6-14 in the ESV. Some translations have an additional occurrence, in verse 14, saying something like “Christ shall give you light” (RSV) instead of “Christ will shine on you.” The light of Christ is intimately intertwined with the love of God. It does not blend well with sexual immorality, impurity, covetousness (which, Paul says, is a form of idolatry), filthiness, foolish talk, or crude joking (Ephesians 5:3–5). He refers to these as “unfruitful works of darkness,” which should be exposed.

Why do we expose the deeds of darkness? Not to judge the world, nor to act like we are better than them, nor to act “holier than thou.” We expose the deeds of darkness because the wrath of God is coming upon the sons of disobedience (verse 6). If we are walking in the light and love of Christ, we realize that our friends and neighbors are in danger of eternal judgment if they continue on that path. We expose the deeds of darkness to reveal their need for a Saviour and invite them to join us as we follow Christ.

How do we expose the deeds of darkness? Declaring the Word of God is one way. Speaking out against different forms of sin is another. However, perhaps the most important way is through our lifestyle. We expose the deeds of darkness by walking in the light of Christ. The Christian’s lifestyle should expose the darkness of sin.

Take a stand to live a life separate from sin. “Do not become partners with them.” If others are heading into a sinful situation, do not join them. For example, if a conversation deviates in dirty jokes or gossip, walk away; do not sit around listening and laughing. We do not shine God’s light by being part of the darkness; we do more to shine the light by saying, “I’m sorry, folks, but as a follower of Christ I cannot be part of this.”

Always seek to discern the will of God and live by it. One important effect of regular prayer and Bible study is the ability to recognize God’s will for our daily lives. We spend too much time trying to figure out when Christ will return or how free will and divine sovereignty can be balanced, and far too little time trying to figure out what God wants us to do throughout the day.

It is not merely enough to avoid sin, though. Our lives should be positive. Seek to bless others. James 2:15–16 gives an example of a person who thinks it is enough to pray for a needy person. In Matthew 25:31–46, Jesus tells a parable contrasting the sheep (those who took sacrificial action to care for those in need and crisis) and the goats (who did nothing to help the needy—I wonder if they just prayed for them like the person in James 2). The life that reflect Christ’s light is not merely one that avoids doing bad things; it is the life that proactively seeks to do good, to glorify Christ by revealing His love in action to those who need to see it.

Too often, we try to witness for Christ by acting like the world. Instead, we should live in such a way that people can clearly see Christ in us and recognize that there is something different about Him and His people. Let us live as though we truly believe that the life He offers is abundant (John 10:10) and surpasses all that the world offers. This is an important place to begin drawing people to Him.

Copyright © 2018 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Renewing the Mind Reflections, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , | 3 Comments

Resolving to Follow Christ in the New Year

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As I write, the year 2017 is approaching its end. Many people are writing down their New Year’s resolutions. Although I usually quip that my New Year’s resolution is to avoid making New Year’s resolutions, I must admit that there is some value to this tradition. Many of us can think of ways we would like to improve our lives. Maybe we want to eat healthier, exercise regularly, get control of our finances, quit a bad habit, etc. We can make positive changes anytime, but somehow it seems convenient to make major life changes while replacing the calendars that are hanging on our walls.

Have you made New Year’s resolutions? If so, where does God fit into them? How does Jesus affect your resolutions. Resolutions are great. Seeking to be a better person in 2018 than you were in 2017 is wonderful. We should all resolve to live better, be healthier, and improve where necessary. But if Jesus is not the Lord of your resolutions, do you truly confess Him as Lord of your life?

Perhaps a great place to start would be by devoting 2018 to re-evaluate who Jesus is
in your life. Far too many of us try to mold Jesus into our own image. To some, He is the all-American Jesus. To others, He is the Republican conservative Jesus. Others think of Jesus as the great social-activist liberal. Some view Jesus as the perfect boyfriend, or their “best bud.” He might be your motivational life coach. The list goes on. Some of these images of Jesus have an element of truth, but often that becomes exaggerated to the point of ignoring some key aspects of His nature. Others are simply wrong, projecting our own self-image onto Him, creating a god after our image, in our likeness. Let us devote 2018 to seek to know Jesus as He has revealed Himself in Scripture, not as we wish He would be.

Our view of Jesus will affect every aspect of our faith in Him. It will affect how we live our lives, what kinds of decisions we make, and how we pray. My mother has at times referred to what she might call “Monty Hall Christianity,” after the host of a game show entitled “Let’s Make a Deal.” Such people treat their faith as an opportunity to bargain with God: “If You do what I want, then I will follow You. If not, I will do my own thing.”

Perhaps we may see an element of that thinking in Jacob’s prayer, after God appeared to him in the vision of a ladder leading to heaven:

Then Jacob made a vow, saying, “If God will be with me and will keep me in this way that I go, and will give me bread to eat and clothing to wear, so that I come again to my father’s house in peace, then the Lord shall be my God, and this stone, which I have set up for a pillar, shall be God’s house. And of all that you give me I will give a full tenth to you” (Genesis 28:20–22).

Notice the wording: “If God will” do this, “then the Lord shall be my God” and I will serve Him. Thank God for His grace, since so many of us pray like this. God answered that prayer, and Jacob’s faith grew. However, it contrasts with the perspective of Daniel’s friends, Shadrach, Meshach, and Abednego:

If this be so, our God whom we serve is able to deliver us from the burning fiery
furnace, and he will deliver us out of your hand, O king. But if not, be it known to you, O king, that we will not serve your gods or worship the golden image that you have set up” (Daniel 3:17–18).

In other words, “We know God can protect us and do what we want. But even if He does not give in to our demands, we will continue to worship Him. Case closed!”

Many of us treat God like He is our cosmic butler or servant. We expect Him to fulfill our wishes, give us what we want, and make us feel good about ourselves. We want Him to justify our choices (even when they conflict with the Bible) and bless our goals and plans.

Biblical discipleship recognizes that Jesus Christ is Lord: not butler, boyfriend, bargaining agent, etc. The true disciple of Jesus does not pray, “My will be done,” but instead “Thy will be done” (Matthew 6:10; 26:39, 42). The true disciple does not make his plans and then demand that God bless them; instead, he asks God to reveal His will and give wisdom, strength, and direction to accomplish it.

When faced with the opportunity to pray for prosperity or an easy life, the true disciple prays like King Solomon. Solomon could have requested wealth, long life, or the death of his enemies, but he asked God, “Give your servant therefore an understanding mind to govern your people” (I Kings 3:9).

When the early Christians faced threats and persecution, they did not ask God to change the leaders of their government or to make their lives easy. They prayed for the boldness to continue doing what Jesus had told them to do (Acts 4:23–31).

Before we write down our New Year’s resolutions, let us ask God to give us His wisdom:

If any of you lacks wisdom, let him ask God, who gives generously to all without
reproach, and it will be given him. But let him ask in faith, with no doubting, for the one who doubts is like a wave of the sea that is driven and tossed by the wind. For that person must not suppose that he will receive anything from the Lord; he is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways (James 1:5–8).

That is a prayer God is always willing to answer. Instead of making our plans and asking God to bless them, we should ask God to reveal His plans to us.

As we begin the New Year, we have several choices ahead of us. We can continue living as we did in 2017, and will get the same results. We can write out New Year’s resolutions, telling God what we want to do in 2018 and demanding that He bless that, whether it is His will or not. Or, we can begin each day by praying “Thy will be done,” and asking God to give us the wisdom, integrity, and perseverance to seek His will and to fill us anew with the Holy Spirit to guide us throughout the day.

May 2018 be a year when we come to more clearly discern God’s will for our lives.

This post copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

 

Categories: Christian Life, Holidays, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Shepherds, Wise Men, and Ordinary People

And in the same region there were shepherds out in the field, keeping watch over their flock by night. And an angel of the Lord appeared to them, and the glory of the Lord shone around them, and they were filled with great fear. And the angel said to them, “Fear not, for behold, I bring you good news of great joy that will be for all the people. For unto you is born this day in the city of David a Savior, who is Christ the Lord. And this will be a sign for you: you will find a baby wrapped in swaddling cloths and lying in a manger.” And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of the heavenly host praising God and saying,

“Glory to God in the highest,
and on earth peace among those with whom he is pleased!”

When the angels went away from them into heaven, the shepherds said to one another, “Let us go over to Bethlehem and see this thing that has happened, which the Lord has made known to us.” And they went with haste and found Mary and Joseph, and the baby lying in a manger (Luke 2:8–16, ESV).

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Nativity scene at Franciscan church in Sanok, Poland. Photo by Silar (own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons.

The nativity scene (or crèche) is one of the most popular Christmas decorations. Many homes and churches display one throughout Advent and Christmas. According to tradition, it was invented by St. Francis of Assisi (ca. 1181–1226) as a simple teaching aide to help people remember the biblical account of Jesus’ birth. All the key players are present: The Virgin Mary, Joseph, baby Jesus, a few shepherds, three wise men, one or two angels, and a bunch of animals. In a society when most people could not read, such a visual aide was necessary to teach a central story of the Bible.

It may not tell the story perfectly. For example, the shepherds came to visit the baby Jesus possibly within 24 hours of his birth, whereas the Magi (who were not kings) came possibly as late as two years later, when the Holy Family was now living in a house. Nevertheless, we can see the main figures in the account of Jesus’ birth together in one location at once. However, it works as an effective story-telling device.

The story of Jesus’ birth has become so familiar to most Christians, though, that many of us miss a few key points. Consider the key characters:

  • Mary was a virgin, but could anybody really believe that? An unwed woman could be pregnant in only one way: via premarital sex. In a very religious society, the punishment could be as severe as stoning. At the very least, she could face rejection by the community, perhaps even her parents and immediate family. The best she could hope for would be a quiet divorce by her husband and a life of shame and rejection (betrothal was legally binding). She actually got better than she hoped for.
  • Joseph was a working-class artisan, probably living day-to-day. Although we think of him as a carpenter, he may have engaged in other skilled work with his hands to build and repair things. Could he really believe Mary’s excuse, that the baby was sent by God and she had not had sex with another man? If he married her, it would suggest to the rest of the community that he must be the real father. One can only imagine how his carpentry business would fare when he is known as the reprobate who could not control himself until his wedding night.
  • The shepherds: We like to think of them as gentle souls who spent their days taking care of cute little farm animals. However, most people in Bethlehem would have a different perspective: a bunch of dirty, uncouth rogues who smell like sheep droppings, among the outcasts of society. They may not be as bad as tax collectors and harlots, but they would still not be likely to get an invitation to celebrate the birth of a King.
  • The wise men or Magi were perhaps some of the worst pagans a Jew could imagine. Tradition refers to them as kings, but they may have been emissaries for a king. Magi were actually astrologers, who made their living engaging in a practice deemed abominable in the Old Testament (see, e.g., Isaiah 47:13–15).

Who is missing from this story? The Roman emperor with his appointed regional vassal King Herod, the wealthy, the religious elite, the powerful, etc. The people whom we would most likely include in a strategy to save the world from certain doom are not in the nativity scene. God chose to send His Son into the world through the womb of an ordinary woman, one whose family would never appear in the historical records otherwise, into a very ordinary family, in a small town within a politically insignificant occupied territory within in a pagan empire. He chose to reveal His Son first to people from the outer fringes of society and pagan astrologers who found out about Him via a condemned occult practice of observing omens.

However, you do not need to be left out of the nativity scene. Jesus came to invite you to have eternal life with Him and His Father. While the world worships at the altar of materialism and Santa Claus, join the shepherds and wise men to bow before the Son of God in the manger. Invite Jesus to take His place at the center of the most ordinary aspects of your life, so that Christmas can remain with you every day.

This post copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

 

Categories: Bible meditations, Church Calendar: Holy Days and Seasons, Holidays, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Examining Our Ways in Times of Suffering

“Let us test and examine our ways, and return to the Lord!” (Lamentations 3:40).

“We can ignore even pleasure. But pain insists upon being attended to. God whispers to us in our pleasures, speaks in our conscience, but shouts in our pains: it is his megaphone to rouse a deaf world” (C. S. Lewis, The Problem of Pain).

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Jeremiah lamenting over Jerusalem, by Rembrandt [public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

In the midst of Advent and the “joy of the season,” we cannot ignore the reality of human suffering. In fact, the holiday season often magnifies pain and suffering. The world and the church call us to celebrate Christmas: there are gifts to buy, cards to write, parties to attend, extra worship services at church, etc. Yet, ordinary life’s hardships do not recognize holidays. This season, people close to me have been affected by house fires, death, illness, financial strain, the threat of losing their homes, etc. These trials can happen at any time during the year, yet the Advent/Christmas season demands our extra attention and prohibits us from devoting ourselves to the challenges of everyday life; not only that, but we are expected to feel joyful and happy despite our circumstances.

Pain and suffering are a central part of our earthly existence. Sometimes, it seems unfair, as if God Himself is unjust. We try to make sense of suffering, but it does not always work: When the 9/11 attacks occurred in 2001, many Christians sought a biblical rationale. Perhaps God was using these events to judge American materialism and hubris. But, why did some godly people have to die? If God was judging America’s sins, was He also judging the first responders who raced into the building to rescue total strangers?

The answers are rarely obvious or simple. Jeremiah wrote the book Lamentations around the time of the destruction of Jerusalem by the Babylonians, in 586 BC. A godly prophet, from a priestly family, he had suffered for many years. He was persecuted by his countrymen for warning them that this day would come. Now, he suffered with them. It seemed as if his nation was destroyed, doomed to become a footnote on the pages of history. The covenant and promises of God seemed forgotten. Through it all, Jeremiah wept and mourned over the city he loved.

In near the middle of his lamentations, Jeremiah wrote the words at the top of this post: “Let us test and examine our ways, and return to the Lord!” He had warned that the nation of Judah would suffer for its unfaithfulness to God. Even when all seemed lost, he believed there was still hope. God had not changed. No matter how bad things seemed, God still loved His people:

“The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases; his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness” (Lamentations 3:22–23).

God’s love never ceases. Even when things look bleak, He loves us. At times, bad times come to draw us back to Him. God may be shouting to us, as C. S. Lewis wrote.

What is He trying to say? Often, bad things happen to us as a direct result of our sin. Unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases are the natural consequences of sex outside of marriage. If you run into financial problems, the answer may not be to “rebuke the devouring spirit”: you may be spending your money irresponsibly and selfishly.

Let me emphasize that this is frequently, but not always, the case. Sometimes, we suffer the fallout of other people’s mistakes or other circumstances affect us negatively. However, when we face such suffering, we would be wise to examine our ways. Spend some time in prayer, and ask God:

“Search me, O God, and know my heart! Try me and know my thoughts! And see if there be any grievous way in me, and lead me in the way everlasting!” (Psalms 139:23–24).

Ask honestly, “Is there anything I did to contribute to this situation? Is there anything I can learn from this?” It is true that you may be an innocent victim of circumstances. Or, perhaps, you contributed at least partially to it. Perhaps hardship is entirely the result of your mistakes or sins. Admit it to God (confession), ask for His forgiveness, and seek His wisdom and power to live a better life (repentance).

Many people today say that “All things happen for a reason.” However, God’s reasons are never unreasonable, irrational, or capricious. He has a redemptive purpose when bad things happen to us. He is not seeking to destroy us, but rather, to heal us.

This post copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

 

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Renewing the Mind Reflections, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Modern-Day Elijahs VIII: No Turning Back

Now when the Lord was about to take Elijah up to heaven by a whirlwind, Elijah and Elisha were on their way from Gilgal. And Elijah said to Elisha, “Please stay here, for the Lord has sent me as far as Bethel.” But Elisha said, “As the Lord lives, and as you yourself live, I will not leave you.” So they went down to Bethel. And the sons of the prophets who were in Bethel came out to Elisha and said to him, “Do you know that today the Lord will take away your master from over you?” And he said, “Yes, I know it; keep quiet.”
Elijah said to him, “Elisha, please stay here, for the Lord has sent me to Jericho.” But he said, “As the Lord lives, and as you yourself live, I will not leave you.” So they came to Jericho. The sons of the prophets who were at Jericho drew near to Elisha and said to him, “Do you know that today the Lord will take away your master from over you?” And he answered, “Yes, I know it; keep quiet.”
Then Elijah said to him, “Please stay here, for the Lord has sent me to the Jordan.” But he said, “As the Lord lives, and as you yourself live, I will not leave you.” So the two of them went on. Fifty men of the sons of the prophets also went and stood at some distance from them, as they both were standing by the Jordan. Then Elijah took his cloak and rolled it up and struck the water, and the water was parted to the one side and to the other, till the two of them could go over on dry ground.
When they had crossed, Elijah said to Elisha, “Ask what I shall do for you, before I am taken from you.” And Elisha said, “Please let there be a double portion of your spirit on me.” And he said, “You have asked a hard thing; yet, if you see me as I am being taken from you, it shall be so for you, but if you do not see me, it shall not be so.” And as they still went on and talked, behold, chariots of fire and horses of fire separated the two of them. And Elijah went up by a whirlwind into heaven. And Elisha saw it and he cried, “My father, my father! The chariots of Israel and its horsemen!” And he saw him no more.
Then he took hold of his own clothes and tore them in two pieces. And he took up the cloak of Elijah that had fallen from him and went back and stood on the bank of the Jordan.

(Second Kings 2:1–13, ESV)

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A Russian Orthodox icon depicting several key events in the life of Elijah. At the top, Elijah is carried off in a whirlwind by chariots and horses of fire while an angel takes his cloak and drops it to Elisha. Walters Art Museum [Public domain, CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)], via Wikimedia Commons

We do not know how long Elisha followed Elijah. The prophet appointed him during the reign of Ahab. After that king died, there was the short (two years) reign of Ahaziah. Elijah would go to heaven during the reign of Jehoram, the next king. Thus, Elisha followed Elijah for at least two years. It was probably not much longer than that, since God had commanded Elijah to anoint Jehu as king of Israel. Elijah never completed that task, but Elisha would fulfill it (2 Kings 9:1–13).

If Elisha seemed hesitant to follow Elijah at first, his devotion was unquestionable after a few years. Not even the prophet himself could discourage him. From 1 Kings 20 through 2 Kings 1, Elisha seems to sit unmentioned in the background. Elijah still spoke on behalf of the Lord to the kings of Israel, but Elisha is not mentioned. We can only assume that he was watching, listening, and learning. The time would come for Elijah to depart from this world, and then Elisha would fulfill his ministry.

By this time, Elisha probably knew that he was “the next great prophet,” the man chosen to replace Elijah. All of the prophets seemed to know that the day had come for Elijah to leave the world. Several times, other prophets approached Elisha and said, “Do you know that today the Lord will take away your master from over you?” (As if they thought Elisha was the only one person around who was not aware of this, despite his close relationship with Elijah.) Every time, Elisha responded, “Yes, I know it; keep quiet.” In other words, “Yes, I know; I really do not feel like talking about it.” Perhaps all of the prophets struggled with their emotions that day. Elisha really did not want to discuss the situation. Perhaps Elijah wanted to face the moment alone: The man who once complained to God that he felt all alone now wanted to meet his Lord face-to-face, one-on-one, with nobody else around.

Elisha illustrates a key principle of discipleship. Disciples follow, and they do not turn back until God tells them to turn back. Not even Elijah could dissuade Elisha. No emotional impulse could hold him back. His mission was to follow Elijah, and he would stay with him until the last possible moment.

Elisha sought one blessing for his faithfulness: “Please let there be a double portion of your spirit on me.” The most important lesson Elisha had learned was that a true man of God needs the Spirit of God. He could imitate Elijah all he wanted, but it would be completely worthless if the Spirit was not empowering his works and words. So, he insisted on following. He refused to let anybody—not even Elijah himself—discourage him.

Elijah told him that his request would be a hard thing. Yet, if Elisha persisted and kept watching until the last minute, God would grant his request. So he stayed until the Lord sent a majestic escort to bring Elijah, still alive, up to heaven. Even chariots of fire, horses of fire, and a mighty whirlwind could not distract him. He wanted the blessing and remained until he received it.

Although supernatural drama engulfed Elijah, Elisha stood by as an excited observer. At first, it seemed as if nothing dramatic happened to Elisha. However, as the dust settled, he noticed that Elijah had dropped something while leaving. His cloak had fallen off in the midst of the excitement: The same mantle that the prophet had placed on him several years earlier was now in Elisha’s hands. He immediately performed his first miracle, slapping the waters of the Jordan River and asking, “Where is the Lord, the God of Elijah?” (2 Kings 2:14). The waters parted for Elisha and all of the prophets knew that the Spirit of God rested on him as He had on Elijah.

The relationship between Elijah and Elisha offers numerous lessons. For a few years, Elisha followed his mentor, learning how to be a prophet. Most importantly though, he learned the character of a man of God. He learned to remain faithful, to refuse to give in to discouragement; to ask, watch, persist, and believe that God will answer even the hardest prayers.

Elijah met Elisha shortly after one of the darkest days in his life. He had gone to Mount Horeb feeling discouraged, alone, and forsaken, and God directed him to anoint his replacement. Elisha would take up Elijah’s mantle and continue to be God’s voice among the Israelites for many years to come.

Copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Modern-Day Elijahs, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Modern-Day Elijahs VII: The Call to Follow

So he departed from there and found Elisha the son of Shaphat, who was plowing with twelve yoke of oxen in front of him, and he was with the twelfth. Elijah passed by him and cast his cloak upon him. And he left the oxen and ran after Elijah and said, “Let me kiss my father and my mother, and then I will follow you.” And he said to him, “Go back again, for what have I done to you?” And he returned from following him and took the yoke of oxen and sacrificed them and boiled their flesh with the yokes of the oxen and gave it to the people, and they ate. Then he arose and went after Elijah and assisted him (I Kings 19:1921, ESV).

Second_Book_of_Kings_Chapter_2-6_(Bible_Illustrations_by_Sweet_Media)

Elijah and Elisha. Distant Shores Media/Sweet Publishing [CC BY-SA 3.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons.

We continue where our last post left off. Elijah had become discouraged, feeling like his ministry was in vain and he was the last follower of the Lord. Yet, God wanted to reassure him that he was not alone. As Elijah approached the end of his time on Earth, the Lord directed him to prepare for the next generation. Part of that involved “passing the mantle” to the next great prophet, Elisha.

Like Elijah, we often become discouraged. This happens especially when we feel like an entire ministry’s success revolves around us. We may also falsely assume that we will see positive results quickly. If success does not come quickly enough, we think we have wasted our time and energy doing something that we were not good enough to accomplish.

The key purpose of this series is to remind believers that we can and should live with an “Elijah spirit.” As we will see in the last few posts in this series, the ministry of Elijah did not end in 2 Kings 2. God anointed Elisha with the spirit of Elijah (he requested a “double portion” and received it). He also anointed John the Baptist with the spirit of Elijah. To this day, He continues to raise up men and women with the spirit of Elijah. The world and church still needs people like Elijah.The world and church still needs people like Elijah.

Elijah first met Elisha while he was doing something very ordinary. Elisha was “plowing with twelve yoke of oxen.” He was farming, probably like most men in his community. He was not praying; he was not studying the Bible; he was not doing anything to stand out as a spiritual giant. One would not look at Elisha and expect greatness. Yet, God was ready to impart greatness upon him.

God frequently calls the ordinary and anoints them to do extraordinary things. Consider some of the great men of the Bible: Moses and David were tending sheep before God called them; Joseph was an ordinary carpenter before God told him to raise His Son; Peter, James, and John were fishermen. They all had very ordinary jobs, but God called them to play a part in fulfilling the divine plan.

Elijah chose a simple symbolic gesture to communicate Elisha’s calling. He approached him in the field and placed his mantle (or cloak) on his chosen protégé. The message could not be clearer: The prophet wanted Elisha to follow him. First, he wanted to go home and bid his family farewell.

Centuries later, Jesus would invite a man to follow Him and become a disciple. This man would respond in a way that reminds us of Elisha:

Yet another said, “I will follow you, Lord, but let me first say farewell to those at my home.” Jesus said to him, “No one who puts his hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God” (Luke 12:61–62, ESV).

Clearly, Elisha felt it was necessary to let his parents know why he was abandoning the farm to follow the prophet. But, what did Elijah mean when he responded, “Go back again, for what have I done to you?” A recent Bible paraphrase, the Voice Bible, which presents the biblical stories more like television scripts than conventional stories, may shed light on the meaning of Elijah’s vague statement:

Elijah: Go then. Tell them goodbye. What have I done to you?

Elisha realizes that Elijah is questioning his devotion—will he stay with his parents or become a prophet? Elisha demonstrates his devotion to God by destroying his livelihood.

Perhaps Elijah hears the same wavering in Elisha’s voice that Jesus would hear centuries later. The Israelites had been guilty of “hesitating between two opinions” all along, as Elijah pointed out previously on Mount Carmel (1 Kings 18:21). Was Elisha hesitating between two opinions as well? Did he know that God was calling him to a special relationship with the great prophet, yet was afraid or anxious about its effect on his relationship with his family? Was he afraid to take a step of faith into the unknown?

Elijah’s concerns were soon eliminated. Elisha did not simply say good-bye to his family. He made it clear that he would not return. He destroyed the oxen and yoke so he could not longer work the fields. He offered them on an altar as a sacrifice to the Lord. Elisha sacrificed his past and present to the Lord as he surrendered his future.

All who seek to serve the Lord will face the same challenge. Will we cling to the past and present—to our comfortable existence—or will we sacrifice them to God? Will we surrender our future to Him? God may not call us out of our present physical circumstances. He may call us to serve Him while we continue in the ordinary occupation in which He found us. However, He will call us out of the comfort zone in our hearts. He calls us to live by His values and vision, not those of the world around us:

I appeal to you therefore, brothers, by the mercies of God, to present your bodies as a living sacrifice, holy and acceptable to God, which is your spiritual worship. Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that by testing you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and acceptable and perfect (Romans 12:12, ESV).

As we take this bold step, day by day, we continue the legacy of Elijah and Elisha by bringing God’s presence into our ordinary lives.

This post copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Modern-Day Elijahs, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment

Modern-Day Elijahs VI: You’re Not Alone

When Elijah heard it, he wrapped his face in his mantle and went out and stood in the entrance of the cave. And behold, a voice came to him and said, “What are you doing here, Elijah?” Then he said, “I have been very zealous for the LORD, the God of hosts; for the sons of Israel have forsaken Your covenant, torn down Your altars and killed Your prophets with the sword. And I alone am left; and they seek my life, to take it away.”

The LORD said to him, “Go, return on your way to the wilderness of Damascus, and when you have arrived, you shall anoint Hazael king over Aram; and Jehu the son of Nimshi you shall anoint king over Israel; and Elisha the son of Shaphat of Abel-meholah you shall anoint as prophet in your place. It shall come about, the one who escapes from the sword of Hazael, Jehu shall put to death, and the one who escapes from the sword of Jehu, Elisha shall put to death. Yet I will leave 7,000 in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed to Baal and every mouth that has not kissed him.”

So he departed from there and found Elisha the son of Shaphat, while he was plowing with twelve pairs of oxen before him, and he with the twelfth. And Elijah passed over to him and threw his mantle on him. He left the oxen and ran after Elijah and said, “Please let me kiss my father and my mother, then I will follow you.” And he said to him, “Go back again, for what have I done to you?” So he returned from following him, and took the pair of oxen and sacrificed them and boiled their flesh with the implements of the oxen, and gave it to the people and they ate. Then he arose and followed Elijah and ministered to him.

[1 Kings 19:13–21. Scripture taken from the NEW AMERICAN STANDARD BIBLE®, Copyright © 1960, 1962, 1963, 1968, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, 1977, 1995 by The Lockman Foundation. Used by permission.]

[This study continues a series that I stopped writing about a year ago, entitled “Modern-Day Elijahs.” To read other articles in the series, click on “Modern-Day Elijahs” in the “Categories” list on this page. For the first article in the series, click here. For the last article before this one, click here.]

Prophet-Elias-Grk-ikon

Elijah on Mount Horeb, from a Greek icon. Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=1489939

Elijah is meeting with God, and it is a visit that will change the course of his life and the fate of Israel. Elijah has been discouraged. He feels like his ministry is a failure and that he is the last person in Israel who still worships the God of his ancestors.

Discouragement will enslave us. It will make us believe we are alone, or that we are the only people who have ever encountered our problems. It will make us exaggerate how bad things are and will cause us to overlook what is going well. Take a look at Elijah’s grievances, item by item:

  • “The sons of Israel have forsaken Your covenant”—True, but when they saw the fire from heaven igniting Elijah’s offering, they confessed that “The LORD, he is God.” They were at least partially ready to return to Him.
  • They have “torn down Your altars”—But God has already shown that this is not a big deal. He had honored the makeshift altar the prophet built on Mount Carmel. Once they are ready to confess that the Lord is God, they will have no problem restoring the altars and the worship.
  • They have “killed Your prophets with the sword”—As we saw in 1 Kings 18:4, Jezebel did not get all of them. One royal official, Obadiah, was courageous enough to put God first and protect as many prophets as he could. Also, after the duel on Mount Carmel, the people obeyed Elijah’s order to execute the prophets of Ba’al. The tide was turning!
  • “And I alone am left”—Here is the greatest falsehood. Satan is the father of lies, and he will find ways to get you to believe falsehoods. Although I am usually a fan of modern literal translations of Scripture, I think the NASB drops the ball in 1 Kings 19:18, where it quotes God saying, “Yet I will leave 7,000 in Israel, all the knees that have not bowed to Baal and every mouth that has not kissed him.” The King James Version seems to have it correct here: God had left 7,000 for Himself. (Hebrew does not have verb tenses like English does. Therefore, translators are usually forced to rely on context when determining if a verb is present, past, or future tense. This is one of the greatest challenges in Old Testament translation.)

Contrary to the voices of self-doubt and despair that were screaming inside Elijah’s head, he was not alone. He had acted like he was alone, but there were others around who worshipped his God.

The greatest mistake a man of God can make is to believe that God expects him to walk alone. When Jesus ascended to heaven, He did not slap Peter on the back and say, “Good luck, bro; it’s all on your shoulders now!” He left 11 disciples with the same set of instructions. They were supposed to wait together, and then fulfill the Great Commission together. Ministry is rarely a one-man show.

So, God gave Elijah an assignment: raise up other men to help complete the mission. He did not even have to choose them. God told Elijah whom He had chosen, and Elijah’s job was to anoint them for their ministries. He was to anoint a new king of Aram, a new king of Israel, and a new prophet to continue his ministry.

We can learn a few key principles from God’ instructions. First, God’s authority extends over the rulers of the world. Elijah was running in fear from the wife of the current king. Now, God told Elijah, “Go replace that king!” The servant of God should not cower or cater to politicians. We are called to proclaim God’s authority to the politicians and demand their obedience.

Second, God’s authority extends over all the nations of the world, including those who do not know know Him. Phillippians 2 tells us that every knee shall bow to Jesus: That includes the knees of our President, Congressmen from both political parties, Islamic terrorists, deranged dictators of third-world  nations, etc. Our mission is to speak God’s word and advance His kingdom throughout the world.

Third, this is God’s ministry: Not yours. Ironically, the only one of the three men that Elijah personally anointed was Elisha, his successor as prophet. Elisha anointed Hazael as the new king of Aram and Jehu as the new king of Israel.

When Elijah was taken up to heaven, God was not done speaking to the people. He continued to speak through Elisha and performed even more miracles through him than He did through Elijah. In fact, even though Elijah is considered the greatest Old-Testament prophet, we do not have a book by him. God chose other men to write the prophetic books of the Old Testament.

God was not done with Elijah. In fact, it was through this time of discouragement that God could reveal a greater purpose to Elijah: He was not only called to minister to others, but also to minister with others.

There is a reason why Jesus chose to assemble a team of apostles. He knew that people will give in to defeat and discouragement if they try to do God’s work alone. We are not made to serve Him as soloists. If you are facing discouragement in your walk with God, make sure you have other people around you.

This post copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Modern-Day Elijahs, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Wolf and the Lamb—Isaiah 11:6

“The wolf shall dwell with the lamb,
and the leopard shall lie down with the young goat,
and the calf and the lion and the fattened calf together;
and a little child shall lead them” (Isaiah 11:6, ESV).

el_buen_pastor

The wolf shall dwell with the lamb, and a little child shall lead them. “El Buen Pastor” (The Good Shepherd) by Bartolomé Esteban Murillo, ca. 1650.

 In my previous post, I shared some observations regarding the above passage. Most of us have heard the phrase, “The lion shall lie down with the lamb,” so often that we think it is biblical. It seems to be a misquotation of Isaiah 11:6, though.

When we realize that we have misunderstood a passage of Scripture, or we thought it said something different from what it actually says, we need to take action. We need to find out what the Bible actually says and what the Holy Spirit is actually teaching us. Some people are taken aback by this passage, since the lion and the lamb are two aspects of Jesus’ character. They think that a prophecy of Jesus has been taken away if this verse does not say the lion and the lamb lie down together. This verse remains incredibly messianic. It speaks of the coming kingdom of our Lord Jesus Christ, although not exactly as many people expect. (Jesus’ nature as the Lion of Judah and the Lamb of God are brought together in Revelation 5:5-6, and I intend to share about that passage in a forthcoming post.)

Isaiah 11:6 is a key point in a memorable messianic prophecy in the book of Isaiah. It is a lengthy prophecy, one that begins a few chapters earlier, where Isaiah said, “For to us a child is born, to us a son is given; and the government shall be upon his shoulder, and his name shall be called Wonderful Counselor, Mighty God, Everlasting Father, Prince of Peace” (Isaiah 9:6); it is a follow-up to Isaiah’s prophecy of Emmanuel, who would be born of a virgin (Isaiah 7:14; cf. Matthew 1:23).

The prophecy continues, speaking of God’s judgment on the Assyrians and eventual restoration of the people of Israel. Then, in Isaiah 11, we see a glorious promise of the Messiah:

“There shall come forth a shoot from the stump of Jesse,
and a branch from his roots shall bear fruit.
And the Spirit of the Lord shall rest upon him,
the Spirit of wisdom and understanding,
the Spirit of counsel and might,
the Spirit of knowledge and the fear of the Lord.
And his delight shall be in the fear of the Lord.
He shall not judge by what his eyes see,
or decide disputes by what his ears hear,
but with righteousness he shall judge the poor,
and decide with equity for the meek of the earth;
and he shall strike the earth with the rod of his mouth,
and with the breath of his lips he shall kill the wicked.
Righteousness shall be the belt of his waist,
and faithfulness the belt of his loins” (Isaiah 11:1-5, ESV).

I highlighted the word “branch” in there; the Hebrew word is “netzer,” the root of the town name “Nazareth.” When Matthew 2:23 quotes the prophets by saying, “He shall be called a Nazarene,” he is paraphrasing this passage. The “branch of Jesse” was the son of David and son of God, raised in the “town of the branch,” Nazareth. Students of bible prophecy will recognize many of the other attributes of this stump/branch of Jesse as attributes of our Lord, particularly when He comes again in glory to judge the living and the dead.

This is the context of Isaiah 11:6 and the verses that follow:

“The wolf shall dwell with the lamb,
and the leopard shall lie down with the young goat,
and the calf and the lion and the fattened calf together;
and a little child shall lead them.
The cow and the bear shall graze;
their young shall lie down together;
and the lion shall eat straw like the ox.
The nursing child shall play over the hole of the cobra,
and the weaned child shall put his hand on the adder’s den.
They shall not hurt or destroy
in all my holy mountain;
for the earth shall be full of the knowledge of the Lord
as the waters cover the sea” (Isaiah 11:6-9, ESV).

To be honest, from a lamb’s perspective, it does not matter whether it is a wolf or a lion. In the natural realm, both animals would have the same opinion about a lamb: It must be delicious! The wolf does not dwell with the lamb; he eats it. If a lion lies down with a lamb, he eats it. In the natural realm, neither a wolf nor a lion lives peacefully with lambs; given the opportunity, they are both the gentle farm animal’s mortal enemy. The same can be said about the relationship between the leopard and the young goat, or the lion and the calf.

However, the Bible promises a coming age when the suffering that is a normal part of life will be no more: “The reason the Son of God appeared was to destroy the works of the devil” (1 John 3:8). Scripture describes death and suffering as the symptoms of a sin-soaked creation, but Isaiah 11 points to a time when suffering will be no more.

Mankind continues to try to solve the world’s problems by purely secular means. We see this especially in politics and social activism. Another mass shooting? Gun control will solve that. Another terrorist attack? Let’s declare a war on terror. Another epidemic? Surely we can eradicate this disease so nobody ever suffers again. We make grand plans to create a better world. Some of them have limited or even great success. But few, if any, have perfect success. Despite our best efforts, there will be wars, there will be crime, and there will be poverty and disease.

Someday, Jesus will return and wipe every tear from our eyes. And then, the wolf will lie down with the lamb (and I would not be surprised if a lion joins them, and they all enjoy one another’s company). And the Lion of Judah, the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world, who came as a child born of a virgin, shall lead them.

This post copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Advent: A Season of Waiting and Preparation

“Wait for the Lord; be strong, and let your heart take courage; wait for the Lord!” (Psalms 27:14, ESV).

Advent wreath 4

By SolLuna (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

The secular world tells me the Christmas season has begun. I turned on my favorite radio station on Friday, and Christmas songs were playing. After all, Santa Claus had made his grand arrival at the end of the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day parade.

The world says Christmas is here. The church calendar says otherwise. I choose to follow God’s will, not the ways of the world.

Most Americans—even devout Christians—allow the materialistic mindset of commercialism to define Christmas for them. In the retail world, the Christmas season apparently begins shortly before Halloween, when the first Christmas decorations begin to creep onto the shelves of the stores. My first Black Friday email arrived on November 10. (Just for the record, I refuse to shop on Black Friday: It sounds too much like Black Plague and I hate getting caught in the middle of a riot over flat-screen TVs.) However, many Christians think “the Christmas season” begins on the day after Thanksgiving. (We are not even waiting that long anymore; since many stores begin their Black Friday sales one day early, Thanksgiving will soon become “Black Friday Eve.” Future generations will learn that the Pilgrims crossed the Atlantic Ocean on the Mayflower, seeking an open Wal-Mart.) Using this secular commercial calendar, the Christmas season ends on December 25, sometime around 10:00 PM. We may continue saying “Happy Holidays” or “Season’s Greetings” until January 1, but that is only because we cannot wait to get drunk or watch a shiny ball drop.

I would like to challenge that thinking by urging my brothers and sisters in Christ to use the traditional church calendar as a guide. Instead of allowing mass-marketing to guide your life, allow the timeless truths of the Christian faith to shape your paths. By refusing to allow the secular worldview to drag us in its directions, we can take some time to learn God’s lessons for us.

The Christmas season did not begin yet. From a Christian standpoint, Black Friday is nothing (maybe it is the “highest unholy day” of commercialism). Advent began today. This season begins four Sundays before Christmas, and it is a time of waiting and preparation.

During Advent, we remember how the ancient Jews waited for centuries for their promised Messiah. We commemorate how Mary and Joseph prepared for the coming of Jesus during her miraculous pregnancy. However, we do not simply look back and remember these events as detached observers. We join them, as we too are in a season of waiting and preparation. While the ancients were waiting for the first coming of the Messiah, we await His second coming in glory. As we await the celebration of Jesus’ birth, we train ourselves to wait for His return.

This connection between the two comings of Christ can be seen in the song, “Joy to the World.” Read those lyrics carefully. This song is not about Jesus’ birth in Bethlehem; it is about His eternal glorious reign. It is a song about His second coming, but we so easily recognize its connection to His arrival 2000 years ago.

Americans are not very good at waiting. We are used to instant everything. We have microwave ovens, because conventional cooking takes too long. We go to fast-food restaurants, because we do not want to wait for (or prepare) our food; and then, we rush through the drive-through, because we are too impatient to wait online in the store. We demand instant entertainment, instant information, instant gratification.

However, although society demands everything instantly, God calls us to wait. Psalm 27 ends with an exhortation to “wait for the Lord.” The psalmist was being harassed by his enemies; his own family had turned their backs on him. He knew God was ready to bless him, but he knew he had to wait to see the full evidence of protection and restoration. God considers waiting important; He commands us many times in the Bible to wait on Him. Furthermore, patience is part of the fruit of the Spirit. A mature Christian willingly waits for God to act, and he also waits to see what God wants to do in his life.

Take the time to prepare your heart and mind for Christmas. Devote time to prayer, praise, worship, and fellowship. While the world tries to pull you into holiday sales at every store, devote your time and talents to help those who are less fortunate. As the world invites you to “holiday” parties, take some time to attend special services and outreach events at church (yours or other local congregations) where Jesus’ life will be the center of attention. While friends and family try to increase your weight by feeding your fruitcake, take some extra time to increase your love for God by developing more of the fruit of the Spirit.

May this Advent be a season of waiting and preparation for whatever good God seeks to do in your life.

By the way, Christmas season is coming: but that begins on December 25 and lasts 12 days.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Church Calendar: Holy Days and Seasons, Uncategorized | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

The Liebster Award

Thomas, from Motivation of Christian Love and Christenfindenruhe, has nominated my blog for the Liebster Award. It is an interesting prize that bloggers on WordPress have been awarding each other recently: We take the opportunity to acknowledge the blogs we read, and give each other an opportunity to share a little bit about what makes us tick. Danke schön, Thomas. (His post is available here.)

Here is the badge and the rules.

liebster-1-1

Here are the 10 questions he asked:

  1. Why did you start blogging? I mainly began blogging as a continuation or extension of my ministry, and especially as an outlet for my writing. I have always loved writing, and blogging gives me an opportunity to put my ideas out there.
  2. For how long have you been blogging? I’m not sure: I started blogging on WordPress in 2009, but I had one or two blogs on other sites before that. It might be 12 years or so.
  3. What are your hobbies other than blogging? I enjoy music and reading; I sing, play guitar and bass, and used to write a lot of songs. I also enjoy watching soccer.
  4. Is English your mother tongue? Yes. My mother was born in Germany, so I studied German for about seven years. I can still survive in a German conversation, although I may occasionally have to ask a native German speaker to “Sprechen Sie langsam, bitte.” (“Please speak slower.”) I also studied Greek, Hebrew, and Aramaic in seminary, although I’m pretty rusty in all three. (I cannot speak any of them, but I can read biblical Greek. Hebrew and Aramaic are another story.)
  5. What are you writing about (on your blog)? “Darkened Glass Reflections” is devoted primarily to spiritual devotions, reflections about Scripture, and applying the Bible to daily life. Occasionally, I address current events from a biblical perspective. As part of Blogging 101, I signed up to participate in a “Sabbath Scripture Challenge” (writing a brief devotional every Sunday about a passage that spoke to my heart that week), and I am slowly working my way through a series about what we can learn from the life and ministry of Elijah: “Modern-Day Elijahs.” (You can find a link on my home page, under “Categories.”)
  6. How frequently are you posting? I have picked up the pace this year. I am posting about two times per week right now. In previous years, I would try to post “at least once per month,” and that would not happen. One lesson I have learned, and I share it with any new bloggers out there: You never will find time for anything; if you want time to blog, you must make it a priority.
  7. What is your favourite post? That is a difficult question. I think “Lent: A Time of Renewal” is up there among my favorites. I wrote it around Ash Wednesday 2011, and it’s probably the closest my blog ever got to “going viral.” It got around 150 hits within 24 hours. “Teaching, Reproof, Correction, and Training in Righteousness” (a commentary on 2 Timothy 3:16-17) has been my most popular post ever, with 1955 views since it was posted; its lasting success is a big reason why I like to focus on articles about prayer, Bible study, and other spiritual disciplines.
  8. How much time do you spend reading or viewing other blogs? I try to devote 15-30 minutes per evening. There are a lot of interesting posts out there; I wish I could devote more time.
  9. What other questions would you like to answer? Some of the other bloggers out there have asked some great questions. One I saw on others’ posts was “How did you come up with the name for your blog?” The title of “Darkened Glass Reflections” is inspired by 1 Corinthians 13:12, which reads “For now we see through a glass, darkly; but then face to face: now I know in part; but then shall I know even as also I am known.”
  10. What do you like or maybe dislike about the ‘Liebster Award’? I like the opportunity bloggers get to give other writers a little attention and respect. I have a feeling I will find it challenging to find 10 blogs, with less than 200 followers, who have not already been nominated.

Ten Random Facts about Me

  1. My favorite secular musicians are the Bee Gees and the Electric Light Orchestra. Yes, I am a child of the ’70s.
  2. My favorite Christian musicians include Petra, David Meece, Avalon, MercyMe, Daniel Amos, etc. I think my Christian musical tastes may be a lot broader than my secular tastes!
  3. C. S. Lewis is one of my favorite authors. I read Mere Christianity early in my Christian walk and it influenced my thinking more than any book, besides the Bible.
  4. I prefer the “Christian classics” to most modern Christian books. I will take The Imitation of Christ or The Practice of the Presence of God over almost anything on the current bestsellers list any day!
  5. I am a huge soccer fan.
  6. I attend a church that has an interesting mix of liturgical (almost Catholic) worship, with a blend of evangelical and charismatic elements. I like to think of myself as a “Christian in a blender.” (Our church likes to think of itself as “three streams” or “convergent.”)
  7. I am a notorious doughnut-junkie and caffeine addict. I have admitted that I am powerless over coffee and, if I don’t get it, everybody else’s life becomes unmanageable.
  8. I have a few ideas for books and hope to publish a full-fledged book one of these days.
  9. A few of my “Christian role models” from history include Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Saint Patrick. I find the real Saint Patrick to be even more fascinating than the myths and legends that have grown around him.
  10. Related to #9 and #10: I am part German and part Irish, and hope to visit both of my ancestral homelands one of these days.

My Ten Nominees:

I know it’s supposed to be blogs with less than 200 followers. However, I don’t follow a lot of blogs, and some have already been nominated. So, I may have to keep it below 1000 or something like that.

  1. Through Him, With Him, In Him
  2. Eurydice Howell
  3. My Paint Splattered Life
  4. Two Are Better Than One
  5. Daniel Abram
  6. Caffeine Epiphanies
  7. Take Me to Church

Sorry, I guess I could not come up with 10. Every WordPress blog I follow, besides these, has either already been nominated for a Liebster or is simply too big to consider nominating.

My Ten Questions:

I am going to ask the same ten questions Thomas asked me:

  1. Why did you start blogging?
  2. For how long have you been blogging?
  3. What  are your hobbies other than  blogging?
  4. Is English your mother tongue?
  5. What are you writing about (on your blog)?
  6. How frequently are you posting?
  7. What is your favourite post?
  8. How much time do you spend reading or viewing other blogs?
  9. What other questions would you like to answer?
  10. What do you like or maybe dislike about the ‘Liebster Award’?
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