Posts Tagged With: biblical interpretation

 
 

Read, Meditate, Delight, Obey: II. Rightly Handling God’s Word

In our last post, I mentioned some translation issues with 2 Timothy 2:15. Let us look at that entire passage:

“Remind them of these things, and charge them before God not to quarrel about words, which does no good, but only ruins the hearers. Do your best to present yourself to God as one approved, a worker who has no need to be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth. But avoid irreverent babble, for it will lead people into more and more ungodliness, and their talk will spread like gangrene. Among them are Hymenaeus and Philetus, who have swerved from the truth, saying that the resurrection has already happened. They are upsetting the faith of some. But God’s firm foundation stands, bearing this seal: ‘The Lord knows those who are his,’ and, ‘Let everyone who names the name of the Lord depart from iniquity’” (2 Timothy 2:14-19).

Paul was writing to Timothy primarily in his role as a young bishop and pastor. He was to be diligent, making his best efforts to prove himself as a master craftsman handling the word of truth. Half-hearted Bible juggling would not suffice, since others’ faith and souls were at stake.

“Sword of the Spirit” stained glass from Immaculate Conception Catholic Church, Knoxville, TN. Photo by Nheyob [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], via Wikimedia Commons  

Elsewhere, the Bible speaks of itself as a weapon, the sword of the Spirit. Do we handle the Bible as carefully as we handle a weapon? Several years ago, I went several times to a gun range with a friend. He showed me that there is a proper way to handle a gun. There are several things you must do to handle a gun safely. You make certain you are not pointing it at another person (unless you are willing to shoot them). You have to hold each gun a certain way if you want your bullet to hit its intended target without injuring yourself. There is a proper way to load your gun, a proper way to hold it, a proper way to fire it, and a proper way to clean it and store it when you are done. Many things can go wrong when you mishandle or misuse a gun. A wise man will make every effort to diligently properly handle his weapon.

Likewise, many things can go wrong when you mishandle or misuse God’s Word. People’s faith or spiritual well-being can be harmed or damaged. Paul warned Timothy about a pair of teachers “who have swerved from the truth, saying that the resurrection has already happened. They are upsetting the faith of some.” End-time prophecy pundits can often do much damage to the spread of the Gospel and the faith of their listeners. From time to time, a friend calls me, panicking because someone told him some new prophecy fad: “The government’s going to force everybody to implant a microchip under their skin! It’s the mark of the beast! Donald Trump’s the Antichrist! Pope Francis is the Antichrist!” And so on. Apparently, people tell him that they are experts because they study these things on the internet.

Not everything you read on the internet is true. The internet has given us some great opportunities. I can write this article on Sunday evening, post it online that night, and watch as people all over the world read it by the end of the week. Anybody with an internet connection can have a public platform. That is great, because it frees us to share our thoughts quickly and freely. However, it also gives that privilege to people who may not know what they are talking about. Not every person who claims to be a “Bible scholar” or “prophecy expert” deserves those titles. Any conspiracy theorist or fool can publish a crazy idea. Let us be diligent. Let us know God’s Word so that we can be discerning, especially when somebody says things like “God told me,” “The Bible says,” or “Biblical prophecy is being fulfilled before our very eyes!”

Would you trust a preacher who studies the Bible as well as this community maintains its roads?

More importantly, though, let us be diligent so that we can speak God’s truth carefully and accurately. If you teach a Bible study class, pastor a church, or write a blog, you need to spend time reading God’s Word. You need to learn it and know how to explain it properly to others. The Disciple’s Study Bible (Holman Bible Publishers, 1988) says in a note on 2 Timothy 2:15 that ὀρθοτομοῦντα uses “the image of someone laying out a road.” People are going to walk on that road. It needs to reach its destination safely. It should be able to support its traffic. If you are preaching, teaching, or otherwise sharing God’s Word, others will rely on it to reach their spiritual destination. Be diligent to make certain you are properly guiding them.

The committed child of God should be diligent with God’s Word, just like we expect the people who build and maintain our roads and other infrastructure to be diligent with the tasks set before them. Our own souls demand it. Others’ souls may require it.

Copyright © 2019 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Revelation and Scripture | Tags: , , | Leave a comment

I Can Do All Things

“I can do all things through Him who strengthens me” (Philippians 4:13).

This week’s Scripture Sabbath challenge was inspired by an article on the Christian satire website, The Babylon Bee, declaring that the context of Philippians 4:13 has been officially abandoned. Context (a biblical verse or passage’s relationship to surrounding Scripture and the rest of the Bible) matters, and it is spiritual laziness to read and apply a passage without considering how it fits into its own paragraph. Many Christians claim “promises” that God never offered simply by making their own desires the context of a passage, instead of looking at the context where God spoke something.

Philippians 4:13 is one of those verses. A few other victims of context elimination include Jeremiah 29:11 and Matthew 7:1 (probably the worst case of all). Some of these will demand upcoming posts.

Without considering a verse’s context, we make the individual reader the final authority about what the Bible means, and thus the reader becomes the final authority about truth. Essentially, the reader creates a god in his or her own image.

Take those words in Philippians 4:13 exactly as written and ignore the context. See how absurd it can become. “I can do all things!” Just think of some of the things I have wished I could do in my life:

  • I want to be a professional hockey player and break all of Wayne Gretzky’s records. Guess what? I can! I can do all things!
  • I want to become a successful musician, have more number-one hits than the Beatles and Elvis Presley—COMBINED—win a few dozen Grammy Awards, and play every instrument on my album. Guess what? I can! I can do all things!
  • I can become the Supreme Emperor of our planet and clean up our political mess, because I can do all things!
  • I can fly like Superman! Because I can do all things!

Obviously, those were all pretty absurd, but that is my point. Take Philippians 4:13 out of context, and people can claim ridiculous things. In my younger days, I would rely on it to justify my attempts at making a living in sales. The only problem was that I simply do not have the personality to be a high-pressure salesman. That is not what God molded me to become. Other people may try to apply that verse to claim success in other endeavors where they do not belong. Besides that, even if every person declares that they can do all things through Christ, only one act will win the Grammy for Song of the Year, only one person will win the 2016 Presidential election, and I doubt any of us will ever fly like Superman.

So, let us look at that verse again, in context. Note that I usually remove italics and other emphasis when posting verses from the New American Standard Bible on my blog, but I will leave them in this time. In the NASB and KJV, which both attempt to translate the original Greek and Hebrew as literally as possible, italic words indicate that the translators added the words for clarity. With all of this in mind, let us look at Philippians 4:10–14:

“But I rejoiced in the Lord greatly, that now at last you have revived your concern for me; indeed, you were concerned before, but you lacked opportunity. Not that I speak from want, for I have learned to be content in whatever circumstances I am. I know how to get along with humble means, and I also know how to live in prosperity; in any and every circumstance I have learned the secret of being filled and going hungry, both of having abundance and suffering need. I can do all things through Him who strengthens me. Nevertheless, you have done well to share with me in my affliction.”

As we read it now, it does not offer a promise to do the impossible or to be the world’s greatest at anything. The Greek phrase translated “I can do all things” is only two words:  παντα ισχυω. Word-for-word, that is “Everything I am strong.” Paul is thanking the Philippians for sending him material resources (food, money, probably other necessities) while he was imprisoned. Paul has had money, and he has been broke in jail. He has travelled freely, and he has survived in chains. He has learned to be content in all circumstances. Whatever problems he may face, he knew he could get through it. He was strong enough for everything through Christ who strengthened him.

So, there is a great promise in Philippians 4:13, but it is not the one that many people claim. It is not a promise that you can achieve any wild fantasy that enters your mind, or accomplish some great goal that will make you rich, powerful, and popular. It is the promise that, whatever difficulties you face in life, Christ can give you the power to get through it. He will give you the strength you need to get through all of your trials.

Upcoming Scripture Sabbath challenge posts will probably address some of those other context-often-ignored passages of the Bible. I am sure I can handle those through Christ who strengthens me.

This post was written as part of the Scripture Sabbath Challenge.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

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