Posts Tagged With: death

Divine Sovereignty and Omnipotence

“Hallelujah! For the Lord our God the Almighty reigns. Let us rejoice and exult and give him the glory…” (Revelation 19:6–7; all Scripture quotations from the English Standard Version).

Image created with the YouVersion Bible app.

One cannot speak of God’s sovereignty without also speaking of His power. Theologians use the term “omnipotent” to describe God. That is not a term most people use frequently. Comedienne Lily Tomlin’s character, Ernestine the telephone operator, defined it as “That’s ‘potent’ with an ‘omni’ before it.” If that does not help you understand it: The prefix “omni” is from a Latin word meaning “all” or “every”; “potent” means “powerful” or “able.” Thus, “omnipotent” means “able to do everything.”

This would be necessary for divine sovereignty. Sovereignty demands the power or ability to back up one’s authority. Imagine a sovereign nation whose government is unable to enforce its laws: its citizens refuse to obey; the police cannot do anything about it. Usually, the government is unstable and easily overthrown. It may claim the authority to rule, but without power—potency—to back up that claim, it is not truly sovereign.

God has made bold claims for His authority to rule. His bold claims demand bold power. Fortunately, He is such a God.

“By faith we understand that the universe was created by the word of God, so that what is seen was not made out of things that are visible” (Hebrews 11:3).

God created the entire universe by speaking it into existence. He exercises His authority and power merely by speaking. As expansive as the universe is, it is no challenge to the power and greatness of God’s word!

Jesus said that His authority extended beyond the grave. Throughout creation, death strips every living creature of its power and authority. When President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in 1963, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson took the oath of office and assumed the role of President immediately. Why? Because Kennedy could no longer exercise any authority. He could no longer do anything. As a dead man, he no longer had any ability or authority.

However, Jesus was not like other men in this regard:

“For this reason the Father loves me, because I lay down my life that I may take it up again. No one takes it from me, but I lay it down of my own accord. I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again. This charge I have received from my Father” (John 10:17–18).

Pay close attention to what Jesus said.

  • “No one takes {My life} from me”: Nobody had the authority to kill Him. The Jewish leaders, Roman soldiers, and Pontius Pilate thought they were in control, but they had no authority beyond what God had allowed them (John 19:11). “I lay it down of my own accord.”
  • “I have authority to lay it down, and I have authority to take it up again.” It is pretty easy to lay one’s life down. Thousands do that every year by committing suicide. These people are exercising the ability, if not the actual God-given authority, to choose their time and means of death. However, it is not easy to take one’s life back up after laying it down. Only Jesus could do that. The rest of us are just left to decay. However, Jesus did not merely say He had the ability to take up His life again after dying; He said He had the authority. His ability and His authority went hand-in-hand.
  • He had received His authority and ability from His Father. Jesus’ ability and authority were intimately linked to His heavenly Father’s ability and authority.

All humans are limited in our ability and authority. Natural strengths and weaknesses limit us. Somebody may have legal authority to replace all of the electrical wiring in his house, but without a working knowledge of electrical wiring or training as an electrician, he would not have the ability to do so. Illness and death will eventually weaken and eliminate any ability and authority we may have.

However, Jesus does not have this problem. He has conquered death:

“When I saw him, I fell at his feet as though dead. But he laid his right hand on me, saying, ‘Fear not, I am the first and the last, and the living one. I died, and behold I am alive forevermore, and I have the keys of Death and Hades’” (Revelation 1:17–18).

The keys denote authority. Just as keys to an apartment indicate that the holder has authority to open the door and enter, the keys of death and hell indicate the Jesus has authority over death. While physical death eventually conquers all of us, Jesus had authority over death. It did not hold Him down.

This is the God Christians worship. Death could not stop Him. His power is infinite. No problem you face is too big for Him. If His own death could not stop Him, no problem you have is too great for Him. He has the power and the authority to heal, save, restore, and deliver.

Copyright © 2020 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, divine sovereignty, God's Nature and Personality, Omnipotence | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Thank God It’s (Good) Friday

“Then Jesus told his disciples, ‘If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for my sake will find it. For what will it profit a man if he gains the whole world and forfeits his soul? Or what shall a man give in return for his soul?’” (Matthew 16:24–26).

Many who work a Monday–Friday, 40-hour workweek know the feeling. If we greet our co-workers with “Happy Monday,” it must be sarcasm. At 9:15 AM on Monday morning, many workers feel like the weekend was too short. However, by the end of the week, “Happy Friday” is almost a holiday greeting. We have borne the pain and suffering of the week and look forward to the weekend. We work for five days, but we act as if our real life takes place during the weekend.

Music and pop culture celebrate the weekend as if it is the center of our existence. The late 1970s gave us the disco-craze movies “Saturday Night Fever” and “Thank God It’s Friday.” A popular 1980s song declared that “Everybody’s Working for the Weekend.” We act as if the weekend is a grand festival and Friday is its major kickoff event.

Now, we come to Good Friday, and we wonder why we call it good. Most Fridays can be highlighted by happy hour. Those who do not drink still find it to be a good opportunity to go out for dinner or see the newest movie. However, the Friday before Easter emphasizes Jesus’ death. The shadow of death hovers over Good Friday.

Good Friday reminds us that the world’s idea of good conflicts with God’s idea of good. The world views Friday as the victory of leisure and pleasure over labor and drudgery. Good Friday reminds us that the true victory is Christ’s victory over hell and Satan, of life’s victory over death, and the victory of God’s mercy and forgiveness over sin and condemnation.

As we observe Good Friday today, I invite you to join in some of the prayers that the Book of Common Prayer links to Friday:

On Friday mornings:

Almighty God, whose most dear Son went not up to joy but first he suffered pain, and entered not into glory before he was crucified: Mercifully grant that we, walking in the way of the cross, may find it none other than the way of life and peace; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

On Friday evenings:

Lord Jesus Christ, by your death you took away the sting of death: Grant to us your servants so to follow in faith where you have led the way, that we may at length fall asleep peacefully in you and wake up in your likeness; for your tender mercies’ sake. Amen.

For Good Friday:

Almighty God, we pray you graciously to behold this your family, for whom our Lord Jesus Christ was willing to be betrayed, and given into the hands of sinners, and to suffer death upon the cross; who now lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

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Photo taken by Michael E. Lynch, at Graymoor Retreat Center, Garrison, NY, March 2016

A prayer of the Holy Cross, especially suitable for Fridays:

Almighty God, whose beloved Son willingly endured the agony and shame of the cross for our redemption: Give us courage to take up our cross and follow him; who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen.

I admit none of these prayers ooze the enthusiasm of a celebratory dance-party song. However, in each prayer, the shadow of the cross points us to the light of the Resurrection—both Jesus’ resurrection on Easter Sunday and the believer’s resurrection to eternal life when his life on earth is over. Good Friday is good because it points to Christ’s victory: A victory which all believers in Christ Jesus may share:

“Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us also lay aside every weight, and sin which clings so closely, and let us run with endurance the race that is set before us, looking to Jesus, the founder and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is seated at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider him who endured from sinners such hostility against himself, so that you may not grow weary or fainthearted” (Hebrews 12:1–3).

Happy Good Friday, one and all! May it be a reminder of the celebration we anticipate as we prepare for our ultimate rest in heaven.

Copyright © 2018 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Church Calendar: Holy Days and Seasons, Holidays | Tags: , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

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