Posts Tagged With: inspiration of Scripture

 
 

Writing With Purpose Part 2

In my previous post, I shared some thoughts about Luke and John’s reasons for writing their Gospels. They were not alone in their mission and purpose. Peter likewise wrote with a mission. After reminding his readers about some characteristics associated with spiritual growth, he wrote:

And I will make every effort so that after my departure you may be able at any time to recall these things. For we did not follow cleverly devised myths when we made known to you the power and coming of our Lord Jesus Christ, but we were eyewitnesses of his majesty. For when he received honor and glory from God the Father, and the voice was borne to him by the Majestic Glory, “This is my beloved Son, with whom I am well pleased,” we ourselves heard this very voice borne from heaven, for we were with him on the holy mountain. And we have the prophetic word more fully confirmed, to which you will do well to pay attention as to a lamp shining in a dark place, until the day dawns and the morning star rises in your hearts, knowing this first of all, that no prophecy of Scripture comes from someone’s own interpretation. For no prophecy was ever produced by the will of man, but men spoke from God as they were carried along by the Holy Spirit. (II Peter 1:15–21)

First, he wanted them to be able to recall the things he taught them. Second, he assured them that his teaching was grounded in facts, not opinions or guesses. Jesus was not just an abstract concept, an idealized character to represent noble virtues. Peter knew this Man. He had seen Him. He had a personal relationship with Him. He knew Jesus was the Son of God because the Transfiguration was a real, unforgettable experience. Peter had experienced the humanity of Jesus, and he had beheld His divinity. He had denied Jesus, and he had received words of forgiveness from Him. Peter’s teaching was genuine and real because it was grounded in a historical experience with a real God-Man, not a fantasy.

Such an orderly, structured understanding of Scripture remains as necessary as ever. It has been nearly 2000 years since someone walked on planet Earth who could say with absolute certainty, “I knew Jesus when He was ministering in the villages of Galilee.” We are left with His Word, the Holy Spirit, and the teachings that have been passed down through the church over the ages. In 2018–19, it is tempting to replace certain, orderly biblical truth with opinions and feelings. Many Christians say they follow the Bible, but they choose to follow only those parts that they like. Or, they use the Bible to justify their feelings, opinions, biases, and desires.

Over 20 years ago, I began to compile a concise summary outline for Bible studies that would guide people from the basics to a more in-depth knowledge of Scripture. That outline has evolved over time and is now about 20 pages long, summarizing 25 major topic sections, each with multiple subsections. (Each of those subsections may require several blog posts to cover.) I think it will take years to complete it, but if I succeed, readers will be able to learn about some of the key teachings of Scripture and see them in a broader context.

I say “if I succeed,” since life, ministry, and the Holy Spirit can be full of surprises. I may find myself led by circumstances or passion to change directions and cover a different topic. Also, after years out of pastoral ministry, I am in postulancy to be considered for ordination as a deacon in the Charismatic Episcopal Church. Seminary classes and other studies may take priority. I may share insights from such studies on these pages.

One can spend a lifetime studying God’s Word. I have been a follower of Jesus for almost 35 years, reading the Bible heavily all of those years. I am still learning. There is a lot to learn, a lot to reflect upon, and a lot to study.

I look forward to sharing this journey through 2019. May God’s Word and these meditations bless you as we continue along this journey together. Over the next few weeks, we will examine what it means to know God, how we can know Him, and the Bible’s role in this.

Copyright © 2019 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations | Tags: , , , , | Leave a comment
 
 

Writing With Purpose

Writing has been a hobby for me since I was very young. I wanted to be an author since I was in elementary school. In college, I majored in journalism, since that would be one career where I could make a living by writing. Although I did not become a reporter, words and writing have been the center of much of what I do: I work as a content editor at a scientific publishing company, and I grab opportunities to write whenever they appear in ministry. When I was in pastoral ministry, I would often write my sermons word-for-word (mainly to avoid that horrible habit of punctuating my main points with such theological mumbo-jumbo as “um,” “like,” and “you know”).

A page from the Dead Sea Scrolls. Photo by Osama Shukir Muhammed Amin FRCP(Glasg) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)], from Wikimedia Commons

This blog serves as an important outlet for my writer’s itch. It also gives me an incentive to continue studying the Bible so that I can share its insights with anybody who takes the time to read the articles I post. Writers put pen to paper or finger to keyboard for a purpose. Here on Darkened Glass Reflections, one of my goals is to ensure that the purpose and intent of my writing coincide with that of the biblical authors:

Inasmuch as many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the things that have been accomplished among us, just as those who from the beginning were eyewitnesses and ministers of the word have delivered them to us, it seemed good to me also, having followed all things closely for some time past, to write an orderly account for you, most excellent Theophilus, that you may have certainty concerning the things you have been taught. (Luke 1:1–4; all Scripture quotations are from the English Standard Version unless otherwise indicated.)

Two words jump out in that last verse: orderly and certainty. Luke had a mission as he wrote: He wanted to make sure his reader (or readers) knew the truth about Jesus. He lived before mass media. The Gospel was spread by word of mouth, not by websites or 24-hour cable news channels. It is possible that conflicting accounts about Jesus may already have sprung up. Speculation, fantasy, and myth may have mingled with true accounts about the Messiah. Rather than relying on rumors, Luke wanted to pass on what he learned from eyewitnesses and others who had direct knowledge of Jesus. (The first two chapters strongly suggest that one of those eyewitnesses was Jesus’ mother Mary.)

He wanted his readers to be certain about what they had learned. Scholars disagree about the identity of “Theophilus.” Was he a Christian? Was he a government official who wanted to know whether Christianity was a threat to Roman rule? Could “Theophilus” have been a code name Luke made up for an entire church, to avoid problems with any Roman authorities who might intercept his document? All we know is that his name means “lover of God,” so all true Christians can accept it as our code name. Luke wants the lovers of God to know for certain the truth about Jesus and what He taught. Whether Theophilus was an actual person or not, the Holy Spirit ensured that this Gospel would be preserved in the Bible so that all lovers of God could have certainty about the things we have been taught.

Other New Testament writers agree that they wrote with a similar motive:

Now Jesus did many other signs in the presence of the disciples, which are not written in this book; but these are written so that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name. (John 20:30–31)

Some people wrestle with the fact that John’s Gospel does not overlap much with Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Most of the stories he shares do not appear in the other Gospels. But, he makes it clear that he was very selective about what he wrote. Perhaps he thought, “You have heard those parables and about those miracles. Jesus did and said a lot more than I can fit on this scroll. Here are some important teachings by Him.” The teachings and signs John recorded were gathered for a clear purpose: “that you may believe that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of God, and that by believing you may have life in his name.” Luke and John were not writing history for history’s sake. They wanted to make sure people knew Jesus and received salvation through faith as a result. They wanted their readers to have confidence and certainty in their faith.

Ancient writers always wrote with a purpose. As a writer, I need to remind myself frequently that everything I write—whether on this blog or elsewhere—should pursue a goal (even if that goal is “I am bored and want to write something silly just for laughs”). This post has a purpose. That will be more clear as we follow up in the next article.

Copyright © 2018 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

Teaching, Reproof, Correction, and Training in Righteousness

The Church of Jesus Christ prints both a large...

Having correct beliefs about God demands that we recognize false teachings about Him, such as those taught by churches that do not accept the historic tenets of the faith (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

All Scripture is breathed out by God and profitable for teaching, for reproof, for correction, and for training in righteousness, that the man of God may be complete, equipped for every good work (2 Timothy 3:16-17, ESV).

The above passage is one of the familiar passages that we use to teach about the inspiration of Scripture. The King James Bible phrases it as “All scripture is given by inspiration of God” (hence, the theological term “divine inspiration of Scripture”), whereas the ESV translates it more literally, “breathed out by God.” The image depicts the words of the Bible being exhaled from the lips of God.

It is important that we avoid the temptation to simply focus on the fact that God breathed forth these words. Paul tells his young protegé, and us, that God breathed these words forth for a reason. God wants us to learn from His word. This learning is both doctrinal and practical, covering what we both should and should not believe and do. God wants us to know what to believe, and what not to believe; what to do, and what not to do.

Teaching indicates what we need to know. The New Testament teaches that we receive eternal life by believing in Jesus:

  • “For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord” (Romans 6:23).
  • “For God so loved the world, that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life” (John 3:16).
  • “And there is salvation in no one else, for there is no other name under heaven given among men by which we must be saved” (Acts 4:12).

There are certain teachings that are essential to salvation. There are things God wants us to know. I hate to be divisive with other Christians, so I do not reject a professed believer over purely denominationally distinctive doctrines. Accepting other believers who adhere only to your own church’s official statement of faith borders on cultism. Yet, we have to believe in the right Jesus. We have to adhere to certain biblical truths. Since the early centuries of Christian history, the key doctrines of the faith have been best described by the ancient creeds: The Apostle’s Creed and the Nicene Creed are the most familiar. While these creeds do not include every important teaching of Scripture, they are an important starting point. Any church that disagrees with these core teachings cannot truly be considered “Christian.” (I know some believers take offense at the statement, “I believe in … the holy catholic church.” However, the word “catholic” here should be taken in its original meaning of “universal,” indicating that there is one true worldwide body of Christ.)

The “flip side” of teaching would be correction. If teaching is the presentation and definition of truth, correction is exposing error. Again, we need to avoid the temptation to mark everybody as a false believer if they do not share all of our beliefs. Yet, there are some core teachings. If Jesus is truly God in human flesh, and the “fullness of deity dwells bodily in Him” (Colossians 2:9), then He is not merely a nice guy and great teacher who showed us that we can all be gods (He is not some sort of New Age guru). If He was tempted in every way that we are, yet without sin (Hebrews 4:15), we cannot claim that He sinned. If He died on the cross and rose on the third day, we cannot claim that He just swooned during the crucifixion and awoke from a long nap on Sunday morning. If the Bible tells us that we are appointed to die once, and then face a final judgment (Hebrews 9:27), a Christian cannot believe in reincarnation.

In addition to instruction about correct and incorrect belief, the Bible gives us instruction about correct and incorrect behavior. It has to reprove us when we sin. Passages like Ephesians 5:3-20 point out a plethora of sins: adultery, fornication, covetousness, etc. The list can go on and on. God forgives our sins, but He does not shrug about them. He cares deeply that we do His will. That means, we have to avoid doing things contrary to His will.

Along with the negative (what not to do), the Bible gives us specific instruction about things we should do as children of God. This does not mean we do these things to become Christians, or to become children of God. Rather, because we are His children, God gives us training in righteousness. He shows us how to resist temptation, pray, worship. He gives countless examples of ways that we can tell others about Jesus or serve others.

I realize every one of these items could be addressed in greater detail. I made no attempt to give an exhaustive teaching on correct and incorrect doctrine (this would require an in-depth systematic theology textbook, which usually runs about 1500 or more pages). Nor could I cover all examples of godly and sinful living.

However, as we read the Bible, we should look at it from this perspective. What is God trying to tell me? What is He trying to teach me about Himself, or myself, or the world He created? What sinful behaviors or bad habits is He pointing out in my life? What false beliefs is He seeking to correct? What should I be doing as a beloved child of God? Ask these questions whenever you approach God’s Word, and He will reveal His truth to you.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life | Tags: , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

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