Posts Tagged With: resisting temptation

 
 

Spiritual Warfare III: Standing Firm

“Finally, be strong in the Lord and in the strength of his might. Put on the whole armor of God, that you may be able to stand against the schemes of the devil. For we do not wrestle against flesh and blood, but against the rulers, against the authorities, against the cosmic powers over this present darkness, against the spiritual forces of evil in the heavenly places. Therefore take up the whole armor of God, that you may be able to withstand in the evil day, and having done all, to stand firm” (Ephesians 6:10–13).

centurion_2_boulogne_luc_viatour

An actor dressed like a Roman soldier in full armor. Photo by Luc Viatour (https://Lucnix.be) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5)], via Wikimedia Commons

No study about spiritual warfare would be complete without an examination of Ephesians 6:10–20. This passage includes the “whole armor of God,” a set of virtues which Christians wear (in a spiritual sense) to battle Satan. The armor includes the belt of truth, the breastplate of righteousness, the shoes of the gospel of peace, the shield of faith, the helmet of salvation, and the sword of the Spirit. Each of these will be discussed in a forthcoming article. I will also include a discussion about intercessory prayer as a spiritual weapon: Paul mentions this immediately after the whole armor of God (as if it is part thereof), yet most pastors and writers overlook this connection.

It is worthwhile to note, not only what follows the discussion about the armor of God, but what precedes it. Paul is in the “application” part of Ephesians (most of his letters begin with an abstract or theological discussion before he proceeds into a series of practical instructions for living out the Christian life). He was urging his readers to “walk in love” (Ephesians 5:1) and in the Holy Spirit, “submitting to one another out of reverence for Christ” (Ephesians 5:21). This led to an extensive discussion of personal relationships: marriage (Ephesians 5:22–33), parent/child relationships (6:1–4), and master/slave relationships (6:5–9).

It is within this context, of how to apply Jesus’ teaching to interpersonal relationships, that Paul introduces the whole armor of God. Many Christians seek to engage in spiritual warfare by ourselves. We might think that we can resist Satan’s attacks and temptation on our own. We might assume that “I have a personal relationship with Christ so I can go solo.” That is probably one of Satan’s favorite lying strongholds. If he can keep us fighting as Lone Rangers, he can isolate us. If he can isolate us, he can keep us from living a victorious Christian life.

Greek_Phalanx

Illustration of an ancient (Greek) army marching in formation. From Wikimedia Commons (public domain).

Most of the verbs in Ephesians 6 are plural: All Christians are supposed to do them, and we are supposed to do them together. Every Christian is individually responsible to stand firm, but he or she must do so with other believers. The imagery of war calls us into a spiritual army. Our success requires us to engage in battle alongside our fellow spiritual soldiers. Ancient armies usually marched in formation, side by side. They would at times join their shields together so they could protect each other as they advanced.

How do we stand with other believers in spiritual warfare? We must be honest, transparent, trusting, and trustworthy in our fellowship with other Christians. We must share our burdens with each other. If you do not have a few prayer and accountability partners, find them. Find a few mature Christians, whom you can trust. Share your battles with one another. Be honest about your victories, failures, and temptations. Encourage them when they fail; do not gossip nor condemn. When you are able to unite as a spiritual phalanx, you will be able to walk side-by-side to victory over the forces of darkness.

Our first response when Satan attacks is to stand. We must resist him. To do so, we must follow our Commander’s orders:

“Submit yourselves therefore to God. Resist the devil, and he will flee from you” (James 4:7).

If we are standing firm, there are some things we cannot do: We cannot surrender to our enemy. We cannot give in. We cannot quit. We cannot flee like defeated cowards. We cannot yield to temptation. Soldiers win by fighting, not by quitting. Among other things, spiritual warfare demands perseverance.

The battle may be spiritual, but it is real. Our victory is assured as we remain in the Lord’s army, but we must remain strong and resilient if we hope to reap the benefits of that victory:

“Be sober-minded; be watchful. Your adversary the devil prowls around like a roaring lion, seeking someone to devour. Resist him, firm in your faith, knowing that the same kinds of suffering are being experienced by your brotherhood throughout the world. And after you have suffered a little while, the God of all grace, who has called you to his eternal glory in Christ, will himself restore, confirm, strengthen, and establish you. To him be the dominion forever and ever. Amen” (I Peter 5:8–11).

Copyright © 2018 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Spiritual Warfare | Tags: , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Scripture Sabbath Challenge—1 Corinthians 10:13

“No temptation has overtaken you but such as is common to man; and God is faithful, who will not allow you to be tempted beyond what you are able, but with the temptation will provide the way of escape also, so that you will be able to endure it.” (1 Corinthians 10:13, NASB)

1-corinthians-10-13-1024x768This verse does not say that your temptations are easy. It just promises us that God will provide the way of escape out of your temptations. I share that observation right from the beginning, because there are times when I have been discouraged by temptation. If this verse is true, why did I fail? Did God actually allow me to be tempted beyond what I am able to handle?

The temptations Paul’s audiences faced were, at times, incredible. Corinth has been called “the Las Vegas of the Ancient World,” due to the prevalence of brothels, saloons, and other forms of wickedness and immorality. With top-flight athletes competing nude at the Isthmian Games, a temple devoted to the worship of the Greek goddess of love, Aphrodite, etc., sin was rampant. A committed Christian would find it difficult, if not impossible, to walk out of his or her house without being offered the sinful pleasures of this world.

Actually, as I wrote that last paragraph, I thought, “That sounds like New York!” Professional athletes here may not compete naked: We have the Internet and cable TV to provide that temptation. So, we do not even need to leave our houses; debauchery can get pumped directly into our homes if we are not careful.

In addition to such moral challenges, Christians in Paul’s day faced other temptations. Christianity was viewed by many as a threat to the social order, so persecution was a real concern. Christians were not only tempted to drink excessively, engage in sexual immorality, or things like that. They were tempted, by public pressure and government force, to denounce Jesus and return to their pagan roots.

In spite of that, Paul told them that they had not encountered any temptation except those that are common to people, and that God would provide the way of escape. That does not mean the temptation will be easy: Some temptations are ruthless, and we cannot face them alone or in our own strength. A few of our escape routes from temptation may be:

  • Flee the temptation: 1 Corinthians 6:18 urges us to flee sexual immorality, but the “flee” principle applies to a host of other sins. Are you tempted by internet pornography? Get away from the computer: Go for a walk (leave your smartphone home, if necessary). Are you tempted to get drunk? Do not stick around in a bar or at a party where there is a lot of alcohol.
  • Phone a friend: In Galatians 6:1-2, we are told to restore a person who is caught in a transgression “in a spirit of gentleness.” I will take it one step further: Find that gentle fellow believer—someone you can trust—and ask them to pray with you. Perhaps you know someone who has struggled with your temptation in the past and found victory. (Do not look for the person who will tear you down and treat you poorly: Look for the person who understands your temptation, knows how to overcome it, and will love you through it all.)
  • Renew your mind: James 1:14 tells us that a person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own evil desire. Before we blame the devil, we need to remember that he will only use the ammunition we have placed in our own minds. Therefore, “Do not be conformed to this world, but be transformed by the renewal of your mind” (Romans 12:2). Studying Scripture and prayer are a great place to begin. As we allow the Holy Spirit to renew our minds (transforming our thinking) through the Word of God, we defuse some of the ammunition that Satan will try to use against us.

I would love to hear some other suggestions for resisting temptation. Feel free to share your spiritual resources and escape routes in the comments.

This post was written as part of the Scripture Sabbath Challenge.

This post copyright © 2016 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Scripture Sabbath | Tags: , , , , , , | 2 Comments

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