Posts Tagged With: time

Walking in the Light of the World: I. Time and Wisdom

“Look carefully then how you walk, not as unwise but as wise, making the best use of the time, because the days are evil. Therefore do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is. And do not get drunk with wine, for that is debauchery, but be filled with the Spirit, addressing one another in psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, singing and making melody to the Lord with your heart, giving thanks always and for everything to God the Father in the name of our Lord Jesus Christ” (Ephesians 5:15–20, ESV).

lightoftheworld1Recent articles on this blog spoke of the Christian’s calling to reflect the light of Jesus to the world and about how this lifestyle exposes the deeds of darkness. Paul’s discussion about exposing the deeds of darkness in Ephesians 5:6–14 is immediately followed by the above passage.

In the New American Standard Bible, the phrase “Look carefully then how you walk” is translated as “Therefore be careful how you walk.” A former pastor of mine would often say, “Whenever you see ‘therefore’ in the Bible, you need to figure out what it’s there for,” because it closely links the following passage with the one preceding it. Ephesians 5:6–14 tells us that we can expose the deeds of darkness by walking as children of light. Ephesians 5:15–20 gives us several priorities for walking in the light. The former passage tells us what happens when we reflect the light of Christ to a dark world; the latter tells us a few ways to accomplish this.

I will discuss two of these priorities in this post. A companion post will follow in a few days, discussing a few aspects of being filled with the Holy Spirit.

Paul’s first priority in this passage is to make wise use of the time and opportunities God gives us. “{Make} the best use of the time,” (some translations say “Redeem the time”) “because the days are evil.” Time is short. Evil and darkness surround us. The mature man or woman of God should be a wise steward of his or her time. We should give God the first fruits of our time, placing ministry in His name as a top priority in our lives. Readers who are interested in this subject can read a post that I shared several years ago.

Furthermore, we should make it a priority to seek the Lord’s will in every area of your life. “Therefore do not be foolish, but understand what the will of the Lord is.” This should be a daily priority, acknowledging God’s authority over area of your life. Many are willing to acknowledge Him as Lord of our Sundays, and to commit to a time of prayer and Bible reading every day. However, Jesus is not merely Lord of the religious sphere of our lives; He is Lord of every area of our lives. He is as concerned about our careers, families, relationships, hobbies, leisure time, etc., as He is about what book of the Bible we are reading, how much time we spend in prayer, and which church we attend.

There are numerous ways to discern God’s will for your life, but the most important is the Bible. Too many people rely on other things—including their feelings and circumstances—to determine God’s will. The Bible will often tell us to do things that pull us out of our comfort zone, but that is largely because many of us are comfortable with sin.

The alternative to understanding the will of the Lord is foolishness. Proverbs 9:10 tells us that “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom.” If we wish to be wise, not foolish, we will be eager to know the will of the Lord.

Walking in the light demands wisdom: Wise use of our time, resources and opportunities; and wise choices guided by clear discernment and obedience to God’s will. It does not always happen easily. We have to be committed to serving our Lord. We should also be filled, empowered, and guided by the Holy Spirit who dwells within us. This will be the focus of our next reflection.

Copyright © 2018 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Renewing the Mind Reflections | Tags: , , , , , | 3 Comments

Stewardship I: Time

Many people make commitments, at different times, to improve themselves. New Year’s Day brings a new rush of resolutions. Many of us repeat the same resolutions we made the previous year. Many Christians give up something, perhaps a particular comfort food or habit, during the season of Lent, but are no better the following year. Major life transitions may also challenge us to review our priorities and desire to be a better person.

Ironically, most of our resolutions and recommitments are self-centered. They focus on how we can make our own lives better or how we can feel better about ourselves. Few people really think about how they can make the world a better place or truly draw closer to God.

This is the first of a three-part series about stewardship. As you read each part, I challenge you to take a different approach than you may have in the past. Many of us are trying to find way to improve our physical health. Instead, why not commit to improving the health of the body of Christ?

“For just as the body is one and has many members, and all the members of the body, though many, are one body, so it is with Christ. For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body—Jews or Greeks, slaves or free—and all were made to drink of one Spirit. For the body does not consist of one member but of many” (1 Corinthians 12:12-14, ESV).

Paul goes on to describe how each part has its own distinct function. Different parts need to be connected to the body, and each contributes to its overall health. Likewise, every Christian has a blessing to offer to the body of Christ.  We each have different spiritual gifts, natural abilities, interests and passions that equip us to bless the church in different ways.

In this three-part series, I will encourage you to consider how you can bless God’s Kingdom by giving of your time, talents, and treasures.

The Bible often mentions the importance of giving our first fruits to God. This term comes from the Old Testament, where worshipers were expected to bring the first crops they harvested as an offering to the Lord. The term first fruits expanded to include other “firsts”: the firstborn son was consecrated to the Lord; other first blessings were given over to God.

Many Christians are quick to think of first fruits in terms of finances. True disciples pay tithes as a priority, even if there are other pressing financial needs or wants. However, first fruits is not merely a reference to money: It is a principle that applies to all aspects of Christian stewardship. Giving to God is always a priority item. We do not worship God as an afterthought or give Him our leftovers: We give Him the best we can offer.

English: Sacrifice of Cain and Abel

Image via Wikipedia

The Bible’s first account of sacrificial worship bears this out. When Cain and Abel offered sacrifices, Abel offered the first fruits of his flock, while Cain seems to have haphazardly pulled some of his produce together (see Gen. 4:3-4). God accepted Abel’s sacrifice but not Cain’s. Was it because Abel offered a blood sacrifice and Cain did not? This is a popular explanation, but it is weak.  Many explain God’s displeasure with Cain’s offering by citing Hebrews 9:22: “Without the shedding of blood there is no forgiveness of sins.” Yet, there is no indication in Genesis 4 that Cain and Abel were seeking forgiveness at that point. Some fellowship and peace offerings in the Old Testament were vegetables and grain. It seems as though the attitude was what mattered: first fruits represented not only the first, but the best. Abel gave his best, while Cain just gave haphazardly.

God wants and deserves our best. He wants worship and fellowship to be a priority. However, many Christians fit corporate worship in when it is convenient. Favorite television shows, hobbies, the children’s weekend sports activities, and other diversions may keep us from church. If we truly love God and are excited about our salvation, we should be eager to give Him our time. Yet, many Christians give the first fruits of their time and energy to the world (their jobs, leisure activities) instead of to God. Some come to church only if nothing else is going on.

Our time at church goes beyond singing a few upbeat songs and listening to an inspiring sermon. True fellowship involves looking for ways to be an encouragement to others: “And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near” (Hebrews 10:24-25). We should seek opportunities to bless others.

We should also bless the body of Christ with our prayers. A serious disciple of our Lord will choose to make time for prayer. Prayer comes before television, not when there is nothing to watch. If we decide to pray “when I get around to it,” we will never commune with God.

My current goal is to pray the four Daily Offices of prayer indicated in the Book of Common Prayer [morning, noon, evening and compline (before bed)]. I usually succeed in praying three of them (I have to confess, I can get lazy around compline time). Getting those prayer times in is not easy: I have to choose to sit down and pray the morning office before work. I have to turn my eyes from my computer at lunch time to pray the noon office. I have to really force myself to pray the evening office. These do not come easily. It starts with a decision that “This is important.” Sure, I can find a TV show to watch or a website to visit, but if I want to pray, I will make the time.

If you are serious about giving God the first fruits of your time, chart your course. How much time will I spend in prayer every day? When will it be? How much of it will be Bible reading, and how much will be prayer? Where will I pray? (This last one is important: You need to find a place where you will not be distracted or interrupted.) Then, based on these decisions, make a commitment to pray. Write it in your planner as an urgent appointment. Eventually, it will become a habit, like eating three meals per day.

It is interesting to note that Paul mentions prayer at the end of his description of the full armor of God in Ephesians 6. He says that we should pray “at all times in the Spirit, with all prayer and supplication” (Ephesians 6:18). He urges his readers to pray for him. This should remind us to pray for our brothers and sisters in Christ, especially our spiritual leaders. Your pastor needs your prayers. If your church does not publish a prayer list or notify members about prayer requests, ask you pastor how you can pray for the church. Commit to being a prayer warrior for your church.

If the word of God is the sword of the Spirit (Ephesians 6:17), then prayer is our spiritual missile. It is the weapon that can engage in spiritual warfare across great spans of space and time. Prayer for the church and its members is a vital ministry that all believers, regardless of skills, gifts, or spiritual maturity level, can participate in.

Categories: Bible meditations | Tags: , , , , , , | 3 Comments

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