Posts Tagged With: fatherhood

Fathers’ Day

“Children, obey your parents in the Lord, for this is right. ‘Honor your father and mother’ (which is the first commandment with a promise), ‘so that it may be well with you, and that you may live long on the earth.’ Fathers, do not provoke your children to anger, but bring them up in the discipline and instruction of the Lord” (Ephesians 6:1-4; all Scripture quotations are from the New American Standard Bible).

Photo by Anete Lusina on Pexels.com.

Happy Fathers’ Day to all the fathers and grandfathers who read Darkened Glass Reflections. I would also like to extend that to the other father figures, especially those who are role models to young people who do not have an abiding relationship with their father. Sadly, there are too many fatherless children out there who need that support and guidance. To quote a few noted people from different ideological perspectives:

“Most American children suffer too much mother and too little father” (Gloria Steinem).
“It is easier for a father to have children than for children to have a real father” (Pope John XXIII).
“We need to restore fatherhood to its rightful place of honor” (James Dobson and Gary L. Bauer).

from “The New Encyclopedia of Christian Quotations,” compiled by Mark Water (Grand Rapids, MI: Baker Books, 2000).


Fathers: God has called us to an important ministry. We are called to disciple the next generation: to train our children in the way they should go so that, when they are old, they will not depart from it (Proverbs 22:6). Real fatherhood does not end at conception. It lasts a lifetime. It demands presence, persistence, perceptiveness, and patience. We need to treat fatherhood as a priority, not merely as something we squeeze in after work is done and the sporting events on TV are over. Our ministry as fatherhood has an impact for generations. As Jean Paul Richter said, “What a father says to his children is not heard by the world, but will be heard by posterity.”

I would like to dedicate this post to the memory of my father, Dennis Lynch, who passed away when I was 28 years old. We had some difficult times, but the last 12 years of his life were a testimony to the power of a changed life and the rewards of redeeming your time. His funeral was standing-room-only, not because he held political office or ran a prosperous corporation. He had simply touched numerous lives and was an inspiration to many. (A few of his friends from Alcoholics Anonymous told me “Your father saved my life” at his wake.) During his last years, he showed me that true significance is not measured by money or titles, but by the positive influence in the lives of others. Even if you have made mistakes in life and family, make the best of whatever opportunities you have now. Your past does not have to define your future; it can provide the lessons to make the best of your present and future.

I would like to hear from you. What encouragement or advice would you have for fathers? Share your thoughts or suggestions by clicking the “Leave a comment” link below.

Copyright © 2021 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Character and Values, Christian Life, Family, Holidays | Tags: , , , | 2 Comments

Modern-Day Elijahs IX: Fathers and Families

“Behold, I will send you Elijah the prophet before the great and awesome day of the Lord comes. And he will turn the hearts of fathers to their children and the hearts of children to their fathers, lest I come and strike the land with a decree of utter destruction” (Malachi 4:56, ESV).

Elijah

By 18 century icon painter (Iconostasis of Kizhi monastery, Karelia, Russia) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Elijah ascended into heaven, but his legacy remains. Few biblical prophets share his prominence. Although he did not write any of the books of the Bible, he is considered one of the greatest prophets in Judaism. Only Moses holds higher esteem. When Jesus was transfigured, Moses and Elijah appeared with Him (Matthew 17:1–8).

Part of the reason I called this series “Modern-Day Elijahs” is because God is still seeking men and women to share the “Elijah spirit.” As we will see in the last two articles in this series, the Elijah spirit would reappear in John the Baptist. Yet, all Christians can share the Elijah spirit; James 5:17 shows that all Christians can share Elijah’s prayer power, since he was a “man with a nature like ours.”

Many students of end-time prophecy believe Elijah will return during the great tribulation before Christ returns. They believe he and Moses are the two witnesses in Revelation 11, mainly because the miraculous powers listed in that chapter are similar to theirs. The fact that they have power to shut the sky to prohibit rain (Revelation 11:6) points to some connection with Elijah.

So, do we need the Elijah spirit today? Yes! Malachi 4:56 points out a major area where restoration is needed. This especially relates to Christianity in America.

“He will turn the hearts of fathers to their children and the hearts of children to their fathers.”

We continue to see a radical breakdown of the biblical pattern for family, and Christians are often as guilty as the rest of society. Here are a few examples of this trend:

Let me emphasize that the final point refers to a general trend: Most single parents are doing the best they can. Many do a great job raising their children, and in some cases the children benefit (especially if one parent was abusive). Also, some people who grew up in seemingly healthy two-parent households end up making bad choices leading to addiction, crime, etc. Nevertheless, the statistics point to some disturbing cultural trends. A restoration of a biblical emphasis on family is necessary.

It is no accident that the Old Testament ends with a promise that Elijah will restore the relationship of fathers and children. Our society needs this restoration: Churches should empower fathers to take a more active role in raising their children. When a father is not present in the home, mature men of God can assume a greater role as mentors and role models. The decline of the family will affect society for generations to follow. Strong men of God should do their part to restore the family as the basic foundation of society.

In his time, Elijah stood up against the greatest sin in his culture: idolatry, from which numerous other evils sprang forth. The modern-day Elijah will have to stand against the modern-day idol of selfishness, which lies at the root of much of the family breakdown. It will require the moral courage of an Elijah, willing to stand even when he feels alone in the world; bold to defy the dominion of darkness that speaks through the voices of politicians, media, entertainment, etc. Without bold men and women of God, though, the future of the nation and society can be very grim.

Copyright © 2017 Michael E. Lynch. All rights reserved.

Categories: Bible meditations, Christian Life, Christians and Culture, Current events, Family, Modern-Day Elijahs | Tags: , , , , , | 1 Comment

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